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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
l notions and be guided by us (the clergy), we will make you the Wilberforce of America. Of a very different mould from Dr. Beecher was the young Unitarian minister who now allied himself with Mr. Garrison. One of the sweetest and gentlest of men, disliking controversy with all his soul, he did not for a moment shrink from the path of trial which now opened before him. On the Sunday following the delivery of Mr. Garrison's lectures, Mr. May occupied the pulpit of Rev. Mr. Young at Church Green, in Summer Street. Of course, he said, I could not again speak to a May's Recollections, pp. 20-22. congregation, as a Christian minister, and be silent respecting the great iniquity of our nation. The only sermon I had brought from my home in Connecticut that could be made to bear on the subject, was one on Prejudice—the sermon about to be published as one of the Tracts of the American Unitarian Association. So I touched it up as well as I could, interlining here and there words and s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
ash their teeth, and, in the absence of any other defence, invoked the mob. It was in vain. The fire was kindled. When such men as the Tappans, Alvan Stewart, Gerrit Smith, General Fessenden, Theodore D. Weld, N. P. Rogers, President Storrs, Beriah Green, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Amos A. Phelps, dropped the Colonization Society, Not all those mentioned by Mr. Wright waited for the publication of the Thoughts to discontinue their support of the Society. See, for Arthur Tappan, ante,, of England, will be related hereafter. At the time of the appearance of the Thoughts, Mr. Wright was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in the Western Reserve College at Hudson, O.. and so a colleague of President Storrs and Professor Green (Lib. 3.2). It should be mentioned here that it was owing exclusively to the liberality of Isaac Winslow, of Portland, that Mr. Garrison was enabled to publish his Thoughts (Ms. Aug. 20. 1867, to Samuel May, Jr.) a moral victory was certai
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
er, and Effingham L. Capron, of Uxbridge, Mass.), two clergymen (Beriah Green and S. J. May), and Lewis Tappan, was appointed to wait immediatty and politely bowed out, and bedtime found them forced back on Beriah Green's sarcastic conclusion May's Recollections, p. 83; Second Dec prayer, and timber of the right sort for president was found in Beriah Green himself; Lewis Tappan and Whittier being chosen secretaries. The choice fell upon Beriah Green. A better man could not have been selected. Though of plain exterior and unimposing presence, Mr. Green was Mr. Green was a man of learning and superior ability; in every way above the average of so-called men of eminence. Mr. Tappan, who sat at his right, was ass; upon which the Convention went into Committee of the Whole. Beriah Green expressed his disgust with those who assert that Wm. Lloyd Garriovement, and the like—concluded the business of the Convention. Beriah Green dismissed the assembly in words of thrilling solemnity, never to
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
f writing. Whitter, for instance, is highly poetical, J. G. Whittier. exuberant and beautiful. Stuart is solemn, pungent and severe. C. Stuart. Elizur Wright, Jr. Wright is a thorough logician, dextrous, transparent, straightforward. Beriah Green is manly, eloquent, vigorous, devotional. May is persuasive, zealous, overflowing with the milk Rev. S. J. May. of human kindness. Cox is diffusive, sanguine, magnificent, Rev. S. H. Cox. grand. Bourne thunders and lightens. Phelps isAre they not all branded as fanatics, disorganizers and madmen? Has not one of them (Dr. Cox) had his dwelling and meeting-house rudely Lib. 4.114. and riotously assaulted, and even been hunted in the streets of New York? Has not another (Beriah Green) been burnt in Lib. 4.23. effigy in the city of Utica? (To say nothing of the sufferings and persecutions of Arthur and Lewis Tappan, and other individuals.) Why are they thus maltreated and calumniated? Certainly, not for the phraseology