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n, recently a violent secessionist and recruiting officer of the Southern Confederacy, was shot dead this afternoon by Henry Green, city watchman. Tompkins was hallooing for Jeff. Davis, and was requested to desist by Green, when he drew a knife onGreen, when he drew a knife on Green, but was retreating when Green shot him. Tompkins had been endeavoring to send contraband articles southward by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad during the past week, and has been the main cause of the midnight disturbances at the depot Green, but was retreating when Green shot him. Tompkins had been endeavoring to send contraband articles southward by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad during the past week, and has been the main cause of the midnight disturbances at the depot of that road.--Louisville Courier, July 23. Major-General McClellan has been summoned by the Government from Western Virginia to repair to Washington and take command of the Army of the Potomac. General Rosecrans takes his place in command of tGreen shot him. Tompkins had been endeavoring to send contraband articles southward by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad during the past week, and has been the main cause of the midnight disturbances at the depot of that road.--Louisville Courier, July 23. Major-General McClellan has been summoned by the Government from Western Virginia to repair to Washington and take command of the Army of the Potomac. General Rosecrans takes his place in command of the Army of Western Virginia. The Corps d'armes at Washington is to be instantly re-organized and increased by the addition of 100,000 men. The necessary orders have already been given.--Offers of regiments already raised are being made and accepted
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company G. (search)
ner. Jan. 2, 1864. Disch. disa. Oct. 10, 1864, Boston, Mass. Cornelius Murphy, Corp. Lowell, .30, m; laborer. Aug. 9, 1862, Disch. May 20, 1865. John Casey, musician, Lowell, 18, s; laborer. Aug. 9, 1862. Trans. Co. I, 3rd Regt. V. R. C. April 22, 1864. M. O. Oct, 18, 1865. Dennis Quinlan, Musician, Lowell, 18, s; operative July 31, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Unof. Stephen Flurdy, Cook, en. Port Hudson, La. 28. July 1, 1863. Died Aug. 2, 1864. Sprague Hosp. N. C. Henry Green, Cook, en. Port Hudson, La. 35. Sept. 1, 1863. Deserted July 16, 1864. Unof. Andrew Hawkins, Cook, Virginia; cook. May 10, 1863. Dropped from records, June 1865. Unof. Anthony Jones, Cook, en. Port Hudson, La. 19. July 1, 1862. On detached service since March 13, 1864. Unof. James M. Manning, Cook, en. Alexandria, 22. May 10, 1863. Returned with Regiment to Boston, 1865. Green Richardson, Cook, en. Port Hudson, La. Sept. 1, 1863, Disch. July 28, 1865. John Bagley
t and the Elizabeth Isles, he had bought, in 1641, of James Forrett, agent for Lord Stirling, who had received a grant for Long Island and the adjacent islands from the Council for New England, in 1635. They settled at Edgarton, and invited Mr. Henry Green, Mr. Henry Green, first minister of Reading, died after a pastorate of only two and one-half years. Mather wrote of him:— On earth's bed thou at noon hast laid thy head. a scholar, to be their pastor, but he went not, and Thomas MaheMr. Henry Green, first minister of Reading, died after a pastorate of only two and one-half years. Mather wrote of him:— On earth's bed thou at noon hast laid thy head. a scholar, to be their pastor, but he went not, and Thomas Mahew, Jr., was ordained their pastor, and found himself presently employed in missionary work The missionary labors of young Mayhew among the Indians at Martha's Vineyard antedate those of the Apostle John Eliot, whose first essay in preaching to the Indians was made in a hut near the falls of Charles River, opposite Watertown or Waltham, October 28, 1646. among the natives who surrounded them, and whose deplorable condition attracted the benevolent attention of these godly settlers. Their Chr
d was doubtless a negro, were Native Americans, and all live Yankees. In 1759 a body of English troops under Lord Amherst arrived to take part in this war; previous to their departure for Lake George, they were encamped in Watertown, at Dirty Green, below the Aetna Mills, on the Charles River, near Pleasant Street. An Act passed May 28, 1760, by the General Court, for assessing the sum of £ 97,345 13s. 0d., levied upon Waltham £ 339 16s. 3d., Weston £ 302 4s. 0d., Watertown £ 374 14s. 4d the first hundred years after its settlement. In 1778 David Bemis, who had purchased 39 acres of land on the Watertown side Probably a part of the grant to Abraham Browne, the first surveyor in the town, who had some acres here above Dirty Green. of the river, and Dr. Enos Sumner, who then owned the land on the Newton side, constructed the original dam across Charles River, at Bemis Station, where the Aetna Mills now are, about one mile above the old mill in Watertown. The next year a p
Massachusetts Bay Company, 10; cuts red cross from the king's ensign, 25; censured for the act, 26; commands first expedition against the Pequots, 41. England, ships return to, 16. English troops for French War arrive, 99; encamped at Dirty Green in Watertown, 100. English weavers employed on hand looms, 126. Epping or Waltham Forest, 66 n. 1. Expenses for equipment and transportation of Winthrop's company, 12. Factory school-house on Elm St., 131; at lower village, 132. FaNew England, 10. Governor's cocked hat, 76. Grant of lands to the new Dorchester Company, 9. Grant of Waltham lands, 52. Granite dam built at factory, 133. Great Dividends, the, 51. Great Pond in the woods, 27 n. 1, 81. Green, Mr., Henry, first minister at Reading, 46 n. 3. Green Tavern (the) , public dinner at, 89. Grist-mill, the first, 123; child carried under the wheel, 124. Groton attacked by Indians, 61. Groton. Suffolk Co., England, 23 n 1. Guild, Rev.