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The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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f the gunboats were struck several times, killing one man and wounding three. The town of Plymouth, N. C., garrisoned by a small force of Union troops, was this day captured by a body of rebels, and partially burned. The U. S. gunboat Southfield, Captain C. W. F. Behm, lying in the stream opposite the town, was also attacked; but, after being considerably damaged she escaped. The schooner Alitia, with thirteen bales of cotton on board, was this day captured by the United States gunboat Sagamore, while attempting to escape from Indian River, Florida.--The bill creating the State of Western Virginia, was passed by the United States House of Representatives by a vote of ninety-six to fifty-five, having been previously adopted by the Senate.--J. Wesley Green published an extended statement, that he brought certain peace propositions from Jefferson Davis to President Lincoln, and that he had several interviews with the President, and two with the Cabinet.--New York Evening Post.
Singular Narrative. The Chicago Times, of a recent date publishes a long letter over the signature of J. Wesley Green, an ornamental painter of Pittsburg, Pa., in which the professes to have been the bearer of peace propositions from President Davis to the Yankee Government at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his intnt at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his interview with President Davis and says that during the interview he was rested most cordially. It seems, however, that Mr. J. Wesley Green has not sustained a very reputable character at home, as he has not long been out of the Penitentiary, where he served a three years term.