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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 10 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
ut the nadir is reached by the Rev. Nicholas Noyes (1647-1717), who in his elegies on the Rev. John Higginson and the Rev. Joseph Green shows promising possibilities of bathos, but who in his poem on the Rev. James Brayley's attack of the stone reveas the Poems by several hands (Boston, 1744). All the poems are anonymous; and aside from humorous ballads probably by Joseph Green, they merely echo Pope, with a plethora of amorous swains and blushing charms. Some were certainly written by Byles, ton found him in Byles. More original and interesting than the poems of Byles are the humorous verses of his friend Joseph Green (1706-1780), a Boston distiller possessed of literary tastes, who ranked with Byles as a wit and social favourite. Afs, and can edify his fellow townsmen with a burlesque account of their nocturnal adventures. Associated with Byles and Green in Poems by several hands was the Rev. John Adams, a young clergyman of Boston who died in 1740 at the age of thirty-five
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
the time, as Moore and the Smith brothers. Halleck is said to have written the last four lines of Drake's American Flag, a lyric full of the old-fashioned expansive and defiant Americanism, and, with its flare of imagery and blare of sound, still sure to stir the blood of any one but a professional critic. And it was on Drake, dead at twenty-five, that Halleck wrote what is the tenderest, the manliest little elegy of personal loss in American literature, beginning with the familiar lines: Green be the turf above thee, Friend of my better days! None knew thee but to love thee; Nor named thee but to praise. Yet they are remembered no less for achievements more noteworthy than those of the other minor men in this sketch. Drake's Culprit Fay is the best and in fact the one fairy story in American verse, if we except Bryant's Sella and The little people of the snow, which are indeed rather stories of mortals in fairyland than of the tiny, tricksy creatures themselves. Though in a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, William, 288, 290, 291, 292, 307, 331 Goethe, 188, 212, 268, 332 Golden Fleece, the, 3 Golden Hind, 1 Goldsmith, 162, 163, 174, 177, 181, 233, 234, 235, 238, 254, 279, 305 Good news from New England, 19 Goodrich, S. G., 240 Gookin, Daniel, 25, 27 Gordon, Thomas, 118 n. Gospel, the, 133 Gospel order revived, the, 55 Graham, Rev., David, 234 Grant, Anne McV., 311 Grave, 263, 271 Gray, Thomas, 171, 176, 177, 181, 183, 276, 278 Greeley, Horace, 276 Green, Rev., Joseph, 153, 160 Green Mountain boy, the, 228 Green Mountain boys, the, 310 Greene, General, 315 Greenfield Hill, 163, 164, 165 Grenville, George, 126 Greyslaer, 225 n., 310 Gridley, Jeremy, 114, 121 Gronov, J. F. (Gronovius), 195 Grotius, 193 Group, the, 175, 217, 218 Growth of Thanatopsis, the, 262 n. Grund, F. G., 190 Guardian, 116 Gulliver's travels, 118 Guy Mannering, 292 Guy Rivers, 314 Gyles, John, 7 H Hackett, J. H., 221, 228, 231
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
eccomb (1708-93) wrote a piece of verse called Father Abbey's will (1732) facetiously describing the estate of Matthew Abdy, sweeper, bed-maker, and bottle-washer to Harvard College. These lines found their way into The gentleman's magazine. Joseph Green, See also Book I, Chap. IX. who became well known for his puns, has left us some mischievous lines on Doctor Byles's cat (1733). The popular impression of Green is embodied in an epitaph which was written for him by one of his friends: Green is embodied in an epitaph which was written for him by one of his friends: Siste, Viator, Here lies one Whose life was whim, whose soul was pun, And if you go too near his hearse, He'll joke you both in prose and verse. These few specimens show, if they show nothing more, that other spirits than Cotton Mather and Jonathan Edwards were alive in America in the eighteenth century. The Revolution produced its humour chiefly in the form of political satire; the principal names are Francis Hopkinson, John Trumbull, Joel Barlow, Philip Freneau. For these four poe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Grady, Henry Woodfin, 321-323, 324, 326, 346 Graham, George R., 61, 168 Graham's magazine, 59, 63, 168, 170, 371, 372 Grandfather's chair, 21, 401, 406 Grandissimes, 359 Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle, 225, 237 Grant, Gen. U. S., 144, 145, 284 Gray Champion, the, 25, 202 Great Bell Roland, the, 280 Great men, 4 Great South, the, 379 Greek Anthology, 240 Greeley, Horace, 61, 167, 187, 189, 190, 191-193, 266 n. Green, Asa, 152 Green, Duff, 183 Green, Joseph, 149 Grey, William, 363 Griswold, Rufus W., 61, 61 n., 62, 62 n., 64, 167, 168 Groen van Prinsterer, G., 138, 146 Guardian Angel, the, 228, 233 Guizot, 128 Hale, E. E., 374, 385, 401, 404 Hale, Nathan, 184, 185 Hale, Sarah J., 168, 398, 399, 408 Haliburton, Judge, Thomas Chandler, 151 Hall, Basil, 127 Hall, Charles Sprague, 279 Hall, James, 163 Hallam, Henry, 128 Halleck, Benjamin Buel, 260 Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 150, 167 Halpine, Charles Graham, 15
f the Royal Society; ordained at Cambridge 25 Nov. 1696, where he d. 15 Feb. 1716-17, a. 54. His w. Elizabeth d. 28 July 1715, and he m. Elizabeth, widow of Rev. Joseph Green of Danvers, and dau. of Rev. Joseph Gerrish of Wenham; she d. at Medford 26 Nov. 1747. See pp. 282-287. 4. Edward, s. of Thomas (1), settled in Marbleheathe f. res. in Lex. and d. 18 July 1747. 14. Joseph, s. of Joseph (5), by w. Anna, had Francis, b. 5 Aug. 1723, perhaps of Concord, whose administrator was Joseph Green 24 Aug. 1752; Sarah, b. 25 Ap. 1725, m. Henry Spring 30 Jan. 1744; Joseph, b. 3 Jan. 1727; Anna, b. 24 Sept. 1728, m. Samuel Manning; Mary, b. 18 Ap. 1730, m. d of births, but bap. Daniel), b. 18 Feb. 1771. Ebenezer the f. res. at Menot. 26. Joseph, s. of Joseph (14), m.——, and had Elizabeth, b. 17 Sept. 1740, m.——. Green of Norwich, Conn., and (2d) Ebenezer Wyeth, Jr. (pub. 3 May 1777); Susanna, b. 9 June 1742; Kezia, b. 19 May 1744; a daughter, b. 10 and d. 22 Nov. 1745; Abigail
dings of the courts, during the witchcraft delusion in 1692. 3. William, s. of Thomas (1), m. Elizabeth Hayman of Boston, 3 Nov. 1697, and had Thomas, bap. 14 Aug. 1698, d. young; William, b. 18 Ap. 1706. William the f. grad. H. C. 1680; Tutor; Fellow, 1707 to 1717; Treasurer, 1713 to 1715; Bachelor of Divinity, 1692; Fellow of the Royal Society; ordained at Cambridge 25 Nov. 1696, where he d. 15 Feb. 1716-17, a. 54. His w. Elizabeth d. 28 July 1715, and he m. Elizabeth, widow of Rev. Joseph Green of Danvers, and dau. of Rev. Joseph Gerrish of Wenham; she d. at Medford 26 Nov. 1747. See pp. 282-287. 4. Edward, s. of Thomas (1), settled in Marblehead, was a Captain, m. Mary, dau. of John Legg, and d. in 1719, and his w. Mary m. Col. Edmund Goffe 24 July 1728. 5. William, s. of William (3), m. Katherine, dau. of Gov. Gurdon Salton-stall, 23 Nov. 1727, and had William, b. 4. Jan. 1728-9, d. 14 Oct. 1730; Katherine, b. 2 June 1730, m. John Mico Wendell 13 Aug. 1752, and d. 30
44 (in her 5th year 20 Feb. 1748-9), m. Edward Crafts of Boston 16 June 1768. John the f. res. in Lex. and d. 18 July 1747. 14. Joseph, s. of Joseph (5), by w. Anna, had Francis, b. 5 Aug. 1723, perhaps of Concord, whose administrator was Joseph Green 24 Aug. 1752; Sarah, b. 25 Ap. 1725, m. Henry Spring 30 Jan. 1744; Joseph, b. 3 Jan. 1727; Anna, b. 24 Sept. 1728, m. Samuel Manning; Mary, b. 18 Ap. 1730, m. Ebenezer Wyeth, Jr., 5 Nov. 1751; Aaron, b. 24 Sept. 1731, d. young; Joanna, b. 30 Smuel, b. 30 Sept. 1766, d. 1 Nov. 1811; John, b. 11 Jan. 1769; Joseph (on the Record of births, but bap. Daniel), b. 18 Feb. 1771. Ebenezer the f. res. at Menot. 26. Joseph, s. of Joseph (14), m.——, and had Elizabeth, b. 17 Sept. 1740, m.——. Green of Norwich, Conn., and (2d) Ebenezer Wyeth, Jr. (pub. 3 May 1777); Susanna, b. 9 June 1742; Kezia, b. 19 May 1744; a daughter, b. 10 and d. 22 Nov. 1745; Abigail, b. 4 June 1747, d. 16 May 1751; Francis, b. 13 May 1749; Priscilla, b. 24 Ap. 175
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
n, J. B. Kerr, D. P. Hoyle, Francis Kerr, Jno. Ledford, R. A. McCorkell, J. A. McKay, S. McKenney, Jno. Moal, J. H. McIlhany, W. B. McCaslan, R. R. Newton, Samuel Stark, W. E. Shaw, J. W. Underwood, J. R. Underwood, Robert Underwood, J. P. Underwood, J. D. Williams, Frank West, Jno. Yancy, G. W. Smith, F. Traniple, D. Fallant, W. K. Nants, W. R. Nants, R. B. Hunter, Alfred Bardwin, J. Yount, Jno. Queeny, R. R. Davoust, G. L. Wade, A. J. Cochrane, Joseph Green. [2 officers, 65 men.] Roll of officers and men of Penick's Battery, Poague's Battalion, 3d Army Corps. Capt. N. Penick, one horse, 2d Lieut. A. Barksdale, Jr., two horses, 1st Sergeant F. L. Walker, 2d Sergeant A. H. Reid, 3d Sergeant J. S. Dickerson, 4th Sergeant W. R. Richie, one horse 1st Corporal W. V. B. Moore, 2d Corporal W. T. Carmicle, 3d Corporal L. M. Lloyd, 4th Corporal T. J. Easley, 5th Corporal H. H. Howard, 7th Corporal R. L. Sutphin,
Hutchinson to Dartmouth, 4 November, 1773. but the Meeting only voted the answers daringly affrontive, and then dissolved itself. Hutchinson to——, 24 Nov. 1773. On the same day the people of New-York assembled at the call of their Committee of Vigilance. Let the tea come free or not free of duty, they were absolutely resolved it should not be Narrative prepared for Gov. Hutchinson by Mr. Benjamin Davis, merchant in Boston, 3 Nov. 1773. Narrative prepared for Gov. Hutchinson, by Joseph Green, Esq. Hutchinson to Dartmouth, 6 Nov. 1773; H. 150. Clarke, Faneuil, and Winslow to John Hancock, Moderator, &c., 5 Nov. 1773. Thos. Hutchinson Jr. to John Han cock, &c. &c., 5 Nov. 1773. landed. Tryon to Dartmouth, 3 Nov. 1773; Hutchinson to Dartmouth, 4 Nov. 1773. Resolves of the Sons of Liberty of New-York, 29 Nov. 1773. After a few days' reflection, the commis- Chap. L.} 1773. Nov. sioners for that city, finding the discontent universal, threw up their places; yet the Sons