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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
e Maryland side of the Potomac. The others crossed by the bridge and seized the United States armory and arsenal, and during the next eighteen hours were busy in arousing slaves, cutting telegraph wires, providing defenses against attack, and imprisoning citizens. They were at last besieged in the engine-house by a large number of citizens and militia, to whom were added, on the morning of Tuesday, a force of United States marines, sent from Washington under Colonel Robert E. Lee and Lieutenants Green and J. E. B. Stuart. The marines battered down the door of the engine-house and captured the insurgents, after a brave resistance. In the conflict John Brown was wounded; his sons Watson and Oliver were mortally wounded, and eight others of the party were killed. Five, including another son, Owen Brown, escaped. Seven were captured, and, after trial and conviction, were hanged at Charlestown, Virginia,--John Brown on the 2d of December, 1859; John E. Cook, Edwin Coppoc, John A. Cop
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. (search)
, Price, after a little skirmishing with Mulligan's outpost, bivouacked within 212 miles of Lexington. In the morning (12th) Mulligan sent out a small force which burnt a bridge in Price's path. Price then crossed to the Independence Road, and waited for his infantry and artillery. These came up in the afternoon, and Price then advanced toward Lexington, and drove Mulligan behind his defenses. There was a little skirmishing in a corn-field and in a cemetery through which Price advanced, and in the streets of Lexington, where he opened upon Mulligan with 7 pieces of artillery. Price's movement into Lexington in the afternoon of September 12th was only a reconnoissance in force. Toward dark he retired to the Fair Ground, and waited for his trains to come up, and for reinforcements that were hurrying to him from all directions, including Harris's and Green's commands from north of the Missouri. The investment of Mulligan's position was made as shown on the map, page 309.-editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
Drake: Ala. Battalion, Maj. John S. Garvin; 15th Ark., Col. J. J..Gee; 4th Miss., Maj. T. N. Adair; Tenn. Battalion, Col. B. M. Browder. Floyd's division. First Brigade, Col. G. C. Wharton: 51st Va., Lieut-Col. J. M. Massie; 56th Va., Capt. G. W. Davis. Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 80; m, 120-217. Second Brigade, Col. John McCausland: 16th Va., Lieut.-Col. L. W. Reid; 50th Va., Maj. Thomas Smith. Brigade-loss: k, 24; w, 91 115. Artillery: Va. Batteries, Captains D. A. French and J. H. Guy; Green's Ken. Battery. garrison forces, Col. J. W. Head, Col. J. E. Bailey: 30th Tenn., Maj. J. J. Turner; 49th Tenn., Col. J. E. Bailey; 50th Tenn., Col. C. A. Sugg. Fort Batteries, Capt. Joseph Dixon (k), Capt. Jacob Culbertson: A, 30th Tenn., Capt. B. G. Bidwell; A, 50th Tenn., Capt. T. W. Beaumont; Maury (Tenn.) Battery, Capt. . R. Ross. cavalry: Tenn. Regiment, Col. N. B. Forrest; 9th Tenn. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. George Gantt; Milton's Company Tennessee. Unattached. Tennessee Battalio