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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ds—the right to enter all or divide, by which he meant the right of each section to enter with recognized property all the territories, or a division of the territories on the old line of 36° 30′, or any fair and equal partition. Mr. Jefferson Davis and Mr. Douglas worked together to secure a Congressional declaration against Congressional restriction on the local action of territories, and succeeded in securing an agreement to a motion to that effect made by Mr. Norris, of New Hampshire. Mr. Green, of Missouri, proposed the recognition of the old Missouri Compromise line through all the new territory, but his proposition was rejected. Mr. Stanton, of Tennessee, then asked for a law that the admission of no State out of territory south of 36° 30′ should be objected to because its constitution authorized slavery, which was refused by nearly an exclusively sectional vote. At this juncture Mr. Soule, of Louisiana, proposed a test vote by an amendment to Utah Territorial bill simply d
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
mith county, that State, July 31, 1800. He began the practice of law at Carthage, and subsequently removed to Lebanon, and in 1827 was commissioned state's attorney by Governor Sam Houston. Elected to the legislature five years later, he served on the judiciary committee. In 1841 he succeeded John Bell in Congress, but declined reelection. In 1844 he was elector at large on the Whig ticket, and in 1852 was appointed to the Supreme court to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Nathan Green. He was re-elected by the legislature and by the people, and remained upon the supreme bench until his functions were suspended by the war. In 1861 he was a member of the Peace congress, and was a delegate to the provisional Congress of the Confederate States at Richmond. In 1863 he was elected governor of Tennessee, but the fortunes of war did not permit his inauguration. In addition to these civil positions he held in 1864 the rank of brigadier-general of Tennessee militia. After th
see campaign of General Hood, in the fearful charge at Franklin, fell Gen. Pat. Cleburne, commander of one of the most renowned divisions of the Confederate army, and General Granbury, the leader of one of its most celebrated brigades. Their loss could never be compensated, and to this day the survivors of the army of Tennessee mention their names with reverence. Major-General Thomas Green Major-General Thomas Green was born in Amelia county, Virginia, June 8, 1814. His father was Nathan Green, one of the most eminent jurors of Tennessee, a Supreme court judge, and president of Lebanon law college, that illustrious institution where so many of America's most prominent men received their legal education. In the fall of 1835, at the age of twenty-one, Thomas Green left his home in Tennessee and entered the ranks of the revolutionary army in Texas. He fought his first battle at San Jacinto, April 21, 1836, and from then until the disbandment of the army in 1837, identified hims