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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 74 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 2 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 14 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Green or search for Thomas Green in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
h guns were fired. Everything that was made of wood on the Osage and Black Hawk was pierced with bullets. Upon the iron shield in the pilot-house of the latter were the marks of sixty bullets, a proof The fight at Blair's plantation. From a War-time sketch. of the hotness of the fire. This unequal contest could not continue long, and after an hour and a half the enemy retreated with a loss of over four hundred killed and wounded, as afterward ascertained. Among the former was General Thomas Green, their foremost partisan fighter west of the Mississippi. Of this action Admiral Porter, in his Naval history of the civil War, writes as follows: Selfridge conducted this affair in the handsomest manner, inflicting such a punishment on the enemy that their infantry gave no more trouble, having come to the conclusion that fighting with muskets against iron-clads did not pay. To say nothing of the loss in men inflicted upon the enemy, the Osage had killed the best officer the Confed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
al. Mouton's division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Mouton, Brig.-Gen. C. J. Polignac. Brigade Commanders: Brig.-Gen. C. J. Polignac and Col. Henry Gray. sub-District of North Louisiana, Brig.-Gen. St. John R. Liddell. cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas Green and Maj.-Gen. John A. Wharton. Brigade Commanders: Brig.-Gens. Hamilton P. Bee, J. P. Major, and Arthur P. Bagby. unattached cavalry: 2d La., Col. W. G. Vincent; 4th La., Col. Louis Bush. detachment of Price's Army, Brig.-Gen. To 5200 by the withdrawal of Walker's and Churchill's divisions. . . . Our total loss in killed, wounded, and missing was 3976. (See p. 191, Destruction and reconstruction, D. Appleton & Co., New York.) General E. Kirby Smith, in his official report, says: Taylor had at Mansfield, after the junction of Green, 11,000 effectives, with 5000 infantry from Price's army in one day's march of him. According to General Parsons's report, his division at Pleasant Hill numbered 2200 muskets.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
t the valley of the Red River would be the principal theater of operations and Shreveport the objective point of the columns moving from Arkansas and Louisiana. On the 21st of February General Magruder, commanding in Texas, was ordered to hold Green's division of cavalry in readiness to move at a moment's warning, and on the 5th of March the division was ordered to march at once to Alexandria and report to General Taylor, who had command in Louisiana. About that time the enemy commenced masmy was operating with a force, according to my information, of full 50,000 effective men; with the utmost powers of concentration not 25,000 men of all arms could be brought to oppose his movements. Taylor had at Mansfield, after the junction of Green, 11,000 effectives with 5000 infantry from Price's army in one day's march of him at Keachie. Price, with 6000 or 8000 cavalry, was engaged in holding in check the advance of Steele, whose column, according to our information, did not number les