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four recorded makers of fire arms were so reckless of consequences as combinedly to employ eleven workmen and to use up annually the stupendous sum of $1,000 worth of raw material. The commonwealth was without a powder-mill, without any known deposits of niter, and without any supply of sulphur. Not an ounce of lead was mined, and hardly enough iron smelted to shoe the horses. One of the preliminaries to war was to buy a machine for making percussion caps. Revolvers and sabers, as Col. Wharton Green says, were above all price, for they could not be bought. Cartridge belts were made out of several thicknesses of cloth stitched together and covered with varnish. For the troops so freely offering themselves there were no arms except a few hundreds in the hands of local companies and those that the State had seized in the Fayetteville arsenal. These, according to President Davis, Rise and Fall of Confederate Government consisted of 2,000 Enfield rifles and 25,000 old style, smoo
th two races. The first was a single dash of a mile, $200 entrance, between Mr. Hare's sorrel colt Revenue, Mr. Doswell's Janette, (full sister to Planet,) and Gen. Green's Wharton Green.--An accident marred the enjoyment of the race, the latter horse flying the track and throwing his rider violently to the ground, not, however, Wharton Green.--An accident marred the enjoyment of the race, the latter horse flying the track and throwing his rider violently to the ground, not, however, seriously injuring him, and resulted in his being distanced in the race. Mr. Hare's colt won the race very prettily over Janette, in one minute and fifty-seven seconds. The second was a match race for $1,000, two mile heats, between Mr. Hare's Bullion and Gen. Green's Day break, by imported Albion. This resulted in Mr. Hare's suc Mr. Hare's colt won the race very prettily over Janette, in one minute and fifty-seven seconds. The second was a match race for $1,000, two mile heats, between Mr. Hare's Bullion and Gen. Green's Day break, by imported Albion. This resulted in Mr. Hare's success, Bullion winning in two heats, in the slow time of 4:23 and 4:37.
The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Commander at Mason's Hill and his Aids — a deserter — the enemy's pickets want peace, and don't like to be shot. (search)
will certainly be there. Ninetts will as certainly be on hand, and we incline to think that both Gibbons' and Hare's entrics will come to the scratch for the honor of Manassa. We call the attention of our appreciative cotemporaries of Charleston and New Orleans to the facts stated above; and we append for them and the public the following official statement of the entries for the race: Sweepstakes for 3-year olds, $300 subscription, $100 forfeit, two mile heats, to be run Fall of 1861. W. H. Gibbons' b. c. Constantine, by Revenue, out of Philo by Mariner. Thos. W. Doswell's b. f. Ninette, by Revenue; out of Nine by Boston. Wm. Allen's cn. c. by Red Eye, out of Florence by imp. Herald. T. J. & W. J. Green's b. c. Wharton Green, by Hawkins' Priam, dam by imp. Trustee. D. McDaniel's b. c. by Revenue, out of Die Clapperton by Boston. R. A. Alston's br. f. by Lexington, out of St. Mary by Hamlet. The race is set for the 17th of October.
saved. The others were of little value. Com. Lynch left Cobb's Point with fifty-two officers and men, who have escaped.--But six of his men were killed and three wounded. B. Ham and J. W. Ham, privates in Capt. Jones's company, from Warren county, N. C., and connected with Col. Shaw's 8th N. C. regiment, arrived here on Wednesday night, having escaped from the enemy at Roanoke Island. They represent the fighting as desperate on both sides. Col. Shaw, they say, acted with great coolness and bravery throughout and when forced to surrender was engaged up to the last moment in spiking the guns. Colonel John V Jordan who was in command on the island, it is said displayed great bravery. Gen. Wharton Green's battalion was captured soon after arriving on the island. Adj't Wise, a nephew of Gen. Wise, was shot through the body and killed. The loss of the enemy all concur in setting down at 1,000, while our loss did not exceed 150, according to last accounts.