Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Green or search for Green in all documents.

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the Legislative department decided in favor of the White Basis by 13 to 11--James Madison's vote giving that side the majority; but he voted also against the White Basis for the Senate, making a tie on that point. A strong excitement having arisen on this question, General Robert B. Taylor, of Norfolk, an advocate of the White Basis, resigned, and his seat was filled by Hugh B. Grigsby, of opposite views. At length, November 16th. the Convention came to a vote, on the proposition of a Mr. Green, of Culpepper, that the White Basis be stricken out, and the Federal Basis (the white inhabitants with three-fifths of all other persons ) be substituted. This was defeated — Yeas 47 (including Grigsby aforesaid); Nays 49--every delegate voting. Among the Yeas were ex-President Madison, Chief Justice Marshall, Benjamin Watkins Leigh, Philip P. Barbour, John Randolph of Roanoke, William B. Giles, John Tyler, etc. Among the Nays (for the White Basis) were ex-President Monroe, Philip Doddr
ipline, the four surviving prisoners were conveyed to the jail at Charlestown under an escort of marines. Brown and Stevens, badly wounded, were taken in a wagon; Green and Coppoc, unhurt, walked between files of soldiers, followed by hundreds, who at first cried, Lynch them! but were very properly shamed into silence by Gov. Wisybreak, and continued writing with energy until half-past 10, when he was told to prepare to die. He shook hands with the sheriff, visited the cell of Copeland and Green, to whom he handed a quarter of a dollar each, saying he had no more use for money, and bade them adieu. He next visited Cook and Coppoc, the former of whom had mdelivered to his widow, by whom it was borne to her far northern home, among the mountains he so loved, and where he was so beloved. Cook, Coppoc, Copeland, and Green (a black), were hanged at Charlestown a fortnight after Brown--December 16th; Stevens and Hazlitt were likewise hanged on the 16th of March following. The confede
ublicans in the negative: Yeas 36; Nays 19. Yeas--Messrs. Benjamin, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, C. C. Clay, Clingman, Crittenden, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Green, Gwin, Hammond, Hemphill, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson, of Ark., Johnson, of Tenn., Kennedy, Lano (Oregon), Latham, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pud Slidell, of Louisiana, Mallory and Yulee, of Florida, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, Crittenden and Powell, of Kentucky, A. Johnson and Nicholson, of Tennessee, Green and Polk, of Missouri, R. W. Johnson and Sebastian, of Arkansas--28 from Slave States alone — every Slave State but Delaware being fully represented, and casting iennedy, Latham, Polk, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Toombs, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--26. Nays--Messrs. Benjamin, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, Clay, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Green, Hammond, Hunter, Iverson, Lane, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Powell, Rice, Saulsbury, Sebastian, Slidell, Wigfall, and Yulee--23. [All from Slave States bu
ergies of all the departments of the Government, and the efforts of all good citizens. The vote was now taken on this substitute, which was adopted, as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson-25 [all Republicans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, and R. W. Johnson, of Arkansas--who had voted just before against taking up the Kansas bill-had now absented themselves or sat silent, and allowed Mr. Clark's resolves to supplant Mr. Crittenden
urately discriminates the Counties wherein Slavery and Secession did, from those wherein they did not, at any time, predominate, yet three or four Counties — Monroe, Greenbrier, &c.--which geographically pertain to West Virginia, have, either voluntarily or under duress, adhered to Old Virginia and the Rebellion. note.--The originally proposed State of Kanawha included within her boundaries only the Counties of Virginia lying north and west of, but not including, McDowell, Mercer, Monroe, Green. brier, and Pocahontas--thirty-nine in all, with a total population in 1860 of 280,691, whereof 6,894 were slaves. The Constitution of West Virginia expressly included the five counties above named, making the total population 315,969, of whom 10,147 were slaves. It further provided that the counties of Pendleton, Hardy, Hampshire, Frederick, Berkeley, Jefferson, and Morgan, might also be embraced within the new State, provided their people should, by vote, express their desire to be — wh
right and center, including the regular infantry and cavalry, still stood its ground and sternly faced the foe. Maj. Barry, our Chief of Artillery in the battle, in his official report, after noticing the loss of ten of his guns at the close, through the flight of their supporting infantry, says: The army having retired upon Centerville, I was ordered by Gen. McDowell in person, to p<*>st the artillery in position to cover the retreat. The batteries of Hunt, Ayres, Tidball, Edwards, Green, and the New-York 8th regiment, (the latter served by volunteers from Wilcox's brigade,) 20 pieces in all, were at once placed in position; and thus remained until 12 o'clock P. M., when, orders having been received to retire upon the Potomac, the batteries were put in march, and, covered by Richardson's brigade, retired in good order and without haste, and, early next morning, reoccupied their former camps on the Potomac. Col. J. B. Richardson, commanding the 4th brigade of Tyler's divis
directed and expected to move so rapidly as possible. On the 13th, two regiments were ordered from St. Louis to Jefferson City, and two others from that point to Lexington. Fremont, pressed on every side, thus responded by telegraph, on the 15th, to the requisition upon him for five regiments for Washington City: Reliable information from the vicinity of Price's column shows his present force to be 11,000 at Warrensburg and 4,000 at Georgetown, with pickets extending toward Syracuse. Green is making for Booneville, with a probable force of 3,000. Withdrawal of force from this part of Missouri risks the State; from Paducah, loses Western Kentucky. As the best, have ordered two regiments from this city, two front Kentucky, and will make up the remainder from the new force being raised by the Governor of Illinois. The Rebels of north-eastern Missouri--reported at 4,500--led by Cols. Boyd and Patton, marched from St. Joseph, on the 12th, toward Lexington, where they doubtles
o, by the Puritans, 30. Academies, etc., number of, by the 8th Census, 23. Adams, Charles Francis, nominated for Vice-President by the Freesoilers, 191. Adams, ex-Gove., one of South Carolina's Commissioners to Washington, 411. Adams, Green, of Kentucky, 194. Adams, John, allusion to, 33; 35; 42; letter from, to Robt. G. Evans, 51; letter to Jefferson on the Missouri Restriction, 80; becomes President in 1797, 88; his Treaty with the Indians in 1798, 102. Adams, John Quincy, hfrom the Prince Regent's Manifesto of 1813; the Queen's Proclamation of 1861, 607; demands and receives the persons of Mason and Slidell, 608. Greble, Lt. John T., killed at Great Bethel, 531. Greene, Mrs. Gen., befriends Whitney, 60-61. Green, one of John Brown's men, 294; 298-9. Greenville, Tenn., Union Convention at, 483. Gregg, Col. Maxcy, at Vienna, Va., 533. Grier, Justice, 217; on Dred Scott, 257. grow, Galusha, of Pa., offers a bill for the admission of Kansas, 251;