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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Neale Green or search for Neale Green in all documents.

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o the rifled battery of ten-pounders, under Lieut. Green, United States Army. I was to open fire onlast regiments were first placed Tidball's and Green's batteries-Green's afterwards being removed tport the force of the enemy greatly damaged by Green's battery. I made no other attempt on this fod to take a parallel route through the fields, Green's battery in advance, until it struck the roadallen trees, Maj. Hunt, with his howitzers, Lieut. Green and Lieut. Edwards, with the rifled guns, ps brigade on the Centreville road, and also to Green's battery, but found they had left some time brmed my brigade, the Sixteenth regiment first, Green's battery next, and the Eighteenth, Thirty-firening parade, and being prepared for any duty, Green's battery went on to Arlington, from which plaill ever witnessed by those present. As to Lieut. Green, who had charge of the rifled guns on the renants Platt, Ransom, Thompson, Webb, Barriga, Green, Edwards, Dresser, Wilson, Throckmorton, Cushi[9 more...]
ng Bay, near the lower portion of Anne Arundel County, for the purpose of arresting a certain Neale Green, a noted barber doing business on Pratt street, near Frederick, who is charged with being a pk yesterday morning. On landing, the officers proceeded to a house in the vicinity and arrested Green, who designed remaining there some time, but proposed sending his wife to this city by the steamer Mary Washington, which usually stops at Fair Haven. The officers, with Green and his wife, took passage on the Mary Washington without any knowledge of those on board. Shortly after leaving, tederate army. The names of those arrested with him could not be ascertained last evening. Neale Green was brought up by Lieutenant Carmichael and taken to the Middle Police Station, where he was n on her return trip. Colonel Kenly received information on Saturday of the whereabouts of Neale Green, and immediately despatched Lieutenant Carmichael to arrest him. The expedition has proved a
ed in the first and second sections of the paper herewith, marked A, on the morning of the 18th of July, my troops resting on Bull Run, from Union Mills Ford to the Stone Bridge, a distance of about eight miles, were posted as follows: Ewell's brigade occupied a position in vicinity of Union Mills Ford. It consisted of Rhode's 5th and Siebel's 6th regiments of Alabama, and Seymour's 6th regiment of Louisiana volunteers, with four 12-pounder howitzers, of Walton's battery, and Harrison's, Green's and Cabell's companies of Virginia cavalry. D. R. Jones' brigade was in position in rear of McLean's Ford, and consisted of Jenkins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton'
s brigade, was coming into line of battle, facing Blackburn's Ford. His position was well chosen, and I turned my attention to the placing of Davies' brigade and the batteries. A part of Davies' command was placed in echellon of regiments, behind fences, in support of Richardson; another portion in reserve, in support of Hunt's and Titball's batteries. After completing these arrangements, I returned to Blenker's brigade, now near a mile from Centreville heights, took a regiment to cover Green's battery, and then returned to the heights. When I arrived there just before dusk, I found all my previous arrangements of defence had been changed nor could I ascertain who had ordered it, for Gen. McDowell was not on the field. Col. Richardson was the first person I spoke to after passing Capt. Fry; he was leading his regiment into line of battle on the crest of the hill, and directly in the way of the batteries in rear. It was here the conversation between the Colonel and myself took
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 147.-official report of Col. Davies on the Occupation of Fairfax Court House Va. (search)
Doc. 147.-official report of Col. Davies on the Occupation of Fairfax Court House Va. Headquarters 2D brigade, 5TH Division, July 17, 1861. To Colonel Miles, Commanding 5th Division:-- Agreeably to general order No. 9, the 2d brigade, commanded by me, consisting of the 16th, 18th, 31st, and 32d regiments, and Company G 2d artillery, (Green's light battery,) took the advance of the 5th division, moving on Fairfax Court House by way of the old Braddock road, south of the turnpike road. I found the road very difficult for heavy artillery, and barricaded by trees felled across the road as often as once in a quarter of a mile, requiring the constant use of the pioneer corps. After passing over many of these barricades, we came to a blind barricade directly across the road, and evidently intended for artillery; after making a reconnoissance, we found a small picket posted behind it, when my advanced pickets were ordered to charge and fire upon them, which they did, dispersing it
hings from Major-General Fremont, the State authorities will doubtless afford him an early opportunity of determining whether the war is hereafter to be conducted by his forces and partisans in accordance with civilized usages. The shooting of women and children, the firing into the windows of a crowded court of justice, at St. Louis, the cowardly acts of the Lincoln soldiery towards such respectable and patriotic citizens as Alexander Kayser and A. W. Simpson, the arbitrary arrests of ex-Senator Green, Mr. Knott, Mr. Bass, and other distinguished citizens, the murder of Dr. Palmer, the summary shooting of unarmed men in North Missouri, without the form even of drum-head court-martial, and many other transactions sanctioned or left unpunished by General Fremont's predecessors, are barbarities which would disgrace even Camanches. If like acts cannot hereafter be prevented by motives of humanity, considerations of an enlightened military policy may be awakened in him by the retaliation
, well armed and equipped, and they had a very large body of cavalry. But the question of evacuating Springfield, the key of the entire Southwest, had already been discussed and settled in the negative. It was decided that the loyal citizens of Green and the surrounding counties should not have cause to say we had left them without a struggle, abandoned themselves, their families, their all, to a heartless and desperate foe, until the enemy had felt our steel and tried the mettle of our troopaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were now ordered forward to support the right flank of the Iowas. Colonel Green's regiment of Tennessee cavalry, bearing a secession flag, now charged upon our wounded, who were partially guarded by one or two companies of infantry. Seeing the movement, Captain Totten poured a few rounds of canister into their ranks jus
, well armed and equipped, and they had a very large body of cavalry. But the question of evacuating Springfield, the key of the entire Southwest, had already been discussed and settled in the negative. It was decided that the loyal citizens of Green and the surrounding counties should not have cause to say we had left them without a struggle, abandoned themselves, their families, their all, to a heartless and desperate foe, until the enemy had felt our steel and tried the mettle of our troopaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were now ordered forward to support the right flank of the Iowas. Colonel Green's regiment of Tennessee cavalry, bearing a secession flag, now charged upon our wounded, who were partially guarded by one or two companies of infantry. Seeing the movement, Captain Totten poured a few rounds of canister into their ranks jus