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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for P. V. Green or search for P. V. Green in all documents.

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t to Sarcoxie. Gen. Ben McCulloch, arriving at this juncture from his camp at Elm Springs, Ark., with 3,000 Confederate enlisted men, and Gen. N. Bart Pearce from Osage Mills with a brigade of State troops, they united with Price at Carthage. On the 7th, the combined forces took up the line of march to Cowskin prairie. Colonel Sigel had not been prepared for the strength of resistance there was in the Missouri men who fought him at Carthage. Mein Gott! he said, was ever such thing seen! Green men, never in battle before, standing their ground, hurling defiance, and cheering their own guns at every discharge. His report to his commander, General Sweeny, thus describes the termination of the battle: In the critical moment, Captain Wilkins, commander of one of the two batteries, declared he was unable to advance for want of ammunition! No time could be lost; our troops on the extreme right and left were already engaged. To advance with the rest, without the assistance of artille
iddell's skirmishers. Colonel Gillespie, of the Seventh, was ordered to regain the woods, and the Fifth, Col. L. Featherston, Lieut.-Col. John E. Murray and Maj. P. V. Green, went to Gillespie's assistance, but the enemy was found in great force, and Liddell was soon ordered to retire to the main line. In the afternoon the battlAt Nashville the survivors of Cleburne's division were commanded by Gen. J. A. Smith. In the battle of December 15th and 16th, General Govan was wounded, and Colonel Green took command of the brigade. From this disastrous field the Arkansans of the army of Tennessee fell back through the snow and sleet beyond the Tennessee. Their next fighting was in North Carolina, against Sherman. At the battle of Bentonville, March 19, 1865, Govan's brigade, under Col. P. V. Green, for the last time won the compliments of its superior officers, by repelling the enemy's attacks. Gen. D. H. Reynolds, at the head of his brigade, lost a leg, and Colonel Bunn, who suc