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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 36 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 18 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greene, Christopher 1737- (search)
Greene, Christopher 1737- Military officer; born in Warwick, R. I., May 12, 1737; was major in the army of observation authorized by the legislature of Rhode Island. He accompanied Arnold through the wilderness to Quebec in the fall of 1775, and was made prisoner in the attack on that city at the close of Decem ber. In October, 1776, he was put in command of a regiment, and was placed in charge of Fort Mercer, on the Delaware, which he gallantly defended the next year. He took part in Sullivan's campaign in Rhode Island in 1778, and in the spring of 1781 his quarters on the Croton River, Westchester co., N. Y., were surrounded by a party of loyalists, and he was slain May 13, 1781. For his defence of Fort Mercer, Congress voted him a sword in 1786, and it was presented to his eldest son.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mercer, Fort (search)
Mercer, Fort A strong work on the New Jersey shore of the Delaware, not far below Philadelphia, which in 1777 had a garrison under the command of Col. Christopher Greene, of Rhode Island. After Howe had taken possession of Philadelphia, in September of that year, he felt the necessity of strengthening his position; so, in t above. This admitted British vessels to approach near enough to cannonade the two forts. On the approach of Donop (Oct. 22), Launch of the ship fame, 1802. Greene abandoned the outworks of Fort Mercer, and retired into the principal redoubt. At the edge of a wood, within cannon-shot of the fort, Donop planted a battery ofy guns, and late in the afternoon demanded the instant surrender of the fort, threatening that, in case of refusal and resistance, no quarter would be given. Colonel Greene had only 400 men back of him, but he gave an instant and defiant refusal, saying, We ask no quarter, nor will we give any. Then the besiegers opened their he
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mifflin, Fort (search)
nded by Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of Maryland. Smith made a gallant defence. A hot shot from the fort set fire to the Augusta, and she blew up. After an engagement of several hours, the British fleet retired, and the Americans remained masters of the Delaware a short time longer. Finally the British erected batteries on Province Island, that commanded Fort Mifflin, and brought up a large floating battery, and four 64-gun ships and two 40-gun ships to attack the fort. On Nov. 10 the British opened their batteries on land and water. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, with his garrison of 300 men, sustained the siege six consecutive days. When every gun was dismounted, and the fort was almost a ruin, the garrison left in the night (Nov. 16), after firing the remains of the barracks, and escaped to Fort Mercer, which Colonel Greene, despairing of relief, evacuated Nov. 20. During the siege of Fort Mifflin, about 250 men of the garrison were killed and wounded. The British loss is not known.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Monmouth, battle of (search)
, in the rear, and soon rallied a greater portion of their regiments, and ordered Oswald to take post on an eminence near, with two guns. These pieces, skilfully handled, soon checked the enemy. Washington's presence inspired the troops with courage, and ten minutes after he appeared the retreat was ended. The troops, lately a fugitive mob, were soon in orderly battle array on an eminence on which Gen. Lord Stirling placed some batteries. The line, then, was commanded on the right by General Greene, and on the left by Stirling. The two armies now confronted each other. The British, about 7,000 strong, were upon a narrow road, bounded by morasses. Their cavalry attempted to turn the American left flank, but were repulsed and disappointed. The regiments of foot came up, when a severe battle occurred with musketry and cannon. The American artillery, under the general direction of Knox, did great execution. For a while the result seemed doubtful, when General Wayne came up with
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morgan, Daniel 1736-1802 (search)
Burgoyne and his army in 1777. After serving in Pennsylvania, he joined the remnant of the defeated army of Gates at Hillsboro, N. C.; and on Oct. 1 was placed in command of a legionary corps, with the rank of brigadier-general. He served under Greene; gained a victory in battle at the Cowpens (for which Congress gave him thanks and a gold medal); and was in Greene's retreat. He led troops that suppressed the Whiskey Insurrection, and was a member of Congress from 1795 to 1799. He died in Wi7. After serving in Pennsylvania, he joined the remnant of the defeated army of Gates at Hillsboro, N. C.; and on Oct. 1 was placed in command of a legionary corps, with the rank of brigadier-general. He served under Greene; gained a victory in battle at the Cowpens (for which Congress gave him thanks and a gold medal); and was in Greene's retreat. He led troops that suppressed the Whiskey Insurrection, and was a member of Congress from 1795 to 1799. He died in Winchester, Va., July 6, 1802.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Moylan, Stephen 1734-1811 (search)
Moylan, Stephen 1734-1811 Soldier; born in Ireland in 1734; was a brother of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Cork; was appointed aide-de-camp to Washington in March, 1776, and commissary-general in June. Resigning that post, early in 1777, he commanded a regiment of light dragoons, serving in the battle at Germantown, with Wayne in Pennsylvania, and with Greene in the South. In November, 1783, he was brevetted brigadiergeneral. In 1792 he was register and recorder of Chester county, Pa., and was commissioner of loans for the district of Pennsylvania. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., April 11, 1811.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Brunswick, skirmish at (search)
New Brunswick, skirmish at In June, 1777, Sir William Howe tried to outgeneral Washington in New Jersey, but failed, and was compelled to retreat. Washington held Howe firmly in check at and near New Brunswick, on the Raritan; and on June 20 the former, with his army at Middlebrook, learned that his antagonist was preparing to fall back to Amboy. Hoping to cut off his rearguard, Washington ordered (June 21) Maxwell to lie between New Brunswick and Amboy, and Sullivan to join Greene near the former place, while the main body should rest within supporting distance. These orders failed of execution On the morning of the 22d the column of Germans, under De Heister, began its march towards Amboy. The corps of Cornwallis moved more slowly, for it had to cross the Raritan over a narrow bridge, near the end of which stood Howe, on high ground, watching the movements Greene had a battery of three guns on a hill, but too far distant to be effective When more than one-half of Cornwallis
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ninety-six, Fort (search)
Prince George, on the Keowee River, 147 miles northwest from Charleston. On May 22, 1781, General Greene commenced the siege of this fort. It was garrisoned by American loyalists, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Cruger. Greene had less than 1,000 regulars and a few raw militia. The fort was too strong to be captured by assault, and regular approaches by parallels were made under the directiosciuszko. The work of the siege was interrupted by an occasional sortie for about a month, when Greene, hearing of the approach of Rawdon with a strong force to relieve Cruger, made an unsuccessful effort (June 18) to take the place by storm. On the following evening Greene raised the siege and retreated beyond the Saluda River. Rawdon pursued them a short distance, when he wheeled and marched arrison joined Rawdon's troops on their march to Orangeburg, followed by a train of frightened Tory families. Greene also followed, but soon retired to the high hills of Santee to refresh his troops.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
men that they dispersed and returned home. Cornwallis had then reached Salisbury, where he found the Whigs numerous and intensely hostile. Having relied much on the support of Ferguson, he was amazed and puzzled when he heard of his death and defeat. Alarmed by demonstrations on his front and flanks, Cornwallis commenced a retrograde movement, and did not halt until he reached Wainsboro, S. C., Oct. 27, between the Broad and Catawba rivers. Here he remained until called to the pursuit of Greene a few weeks later. In Civil War days. The popular sentiment in North Carolina was with the Union at the breaking-out of the Civil War, and great efforts were made by the enemies of the republic to force the State into the Confederacy. Her governor (Ellis) favored the movement, but the loyal people opposed it. The South Carolinians taunted them with cowardice; the Virginia Confederates treated them with coldness; the Alabamians and Mississippians coaxed them by the lips of commission
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), O'Hara, Charles 1730-1802 (search)
O'Hara, Charles 1730-1802 Military officer; born in 1730; was a lieutenant of the Coldstream Guards in 1756, and, as colonel of the Foot Guards, came to America in 1780 in command of them. He served under Cornwallis, and commanded the van in the famous pursuit of Greene in 1781. He was badly wounded in the battle of Guilford (q. v.), and was commander of the British right, as brigadier-general, at the surrender at Yorktown, when he gave to General Lincoln the sword of Cornwallis, the latter too ill, it was alleged, to appear on the field. After serving as governor of several English colonies, he was lieutenant-governor of Gibraltar in 1787, and governor in 1795. In 1797 he was made general. He died in Gibraltar Feb. 21, 1802.
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