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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 118 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
icer Goldsborough, or the testimony of Commander Dana Greene, United States Navy, who was the galla and sixty-six miles from Camden; Shelby's and Greene's brigades at Camden. To meet the movement ofiles from Camden), and on the 28th March, with Greene's brigade and a section of Blocker's battery ut the enemy's front, or if need be, Cabell and Greene against his front, while Shelby was in positioe military road and resist him in front, while Greene's brigade (the middle column) would cross the ion from my scouts on the 1st (I was then with Greene's column) was that Steele had certainly advanctrong position at the edge of the bottom, with Greene's brigade, Colonel Greene commanding, one piecColonel Greene commanding, one piece of Blocker's battery, under Lieutenant Zimmerman, Monroe's regiment, Colonel S. C. Monroe commandi that brigade. On the morning of the 17th Colonel Greene's scouts informed me that a large train, tverance, thoughtfulness, and steady courage of Greene, is telling an oft-told tale. The list is too[20 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
(6) that she could not have gone to sea at all; (7) that, although she could have run by the Federal fleet and Old Point (barring torpedoes in the channel) and threatened McClellan's base at Yorktown, in exceptionably good weather, yet would have had to leave the James river open. VII. For the truth of the very important facts mentioned in sections I, II and III, I am willing to abide by the log-book of the Monitor, the dispatches of Flag officer Goldsborough, or the testimony of Commander Dana Greene, United States Navy, who was the gallant and efficient executive officer of the Monitor from the day she left New York until she foundered off Cape Hatteras. VIII. In conclusion I would like to say, and I do so most cheerfully, that the Monitor made her appearance in Hampton Roads at a critical time—the night of the 8th of March, 1862—and although an untried vessel, of a new and peculiar construction, did on the next day what the old Federal fleet present declined to do—she fough<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
and sixty-six miles from Camden; Shelby's and Greene's brigades at Camden. To meet the movement oft the enemy's front, or if need be, Cabell and Greene against his front, while Shelby was in positioe military road and resist him in front, while Greene's brigade (the middle column) would cross the facts taken into consideration, I ordered Colonel Greene to leave Lawther's regiment of his brigadet yet ascertained, and Burbridge's regiment of Greene's brigade, under Lieutenant-Colonel Preston, wd crossing his main army. Having concentrated Greene and Cabell in front of the ferry, posted the mtrong position at the edge of the bottom, with Greene's brigade, Colonel Greene commanding, one piecColonel Greene commanding, one piece of Blocker's battery, under Lieutenant Zimmerman, Monroe's regiment, Colonel S. C. Monroe commandiismounted and deployed in front of the enemy. Greene was held in reserve dismounted. At this time verance, thoughtfulness, and steady courage of Greene, is telling an oft-told tale. The list is too[19 more...]