hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

-sergeant. Another Western boy who saw stirring service, though never formally enlisted, was the eldest son of General Grant, a year older than little Clem, when he rode with his father through the Jackson campaign and the siege of Vicksburg. There were other sons who rode with commanding generals, as did young George Meade at Gettysburg, as did the sons of Generals Humphreys, Abercrombie, and Heintzelman, as did Win and Sam Sumner, both generals in their own right to-day, as did Francis Vinton Greene, who had to be locked up to keep him from following his gallant father into the The first of the boy generals Surrounded by his staff, some of whom are older than he, sits Adelbert Ames (third from the left), a brigadiergen-eral at twenty-eight. He graduated fifth in his class at West Point on May 6, 1861, and was assigned to the artillery service. It was while serving as first-lieutenant in the Fifth Artillery that he distinguished himself at Bull Run and was brevetted m
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greene, Francis Vinton 1850- (search)
Greene, Francis Vinton 1850- Military officer; born in Providence, R. I., June 27, 1850; son of Gen. George Sears Greene; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1870, and commissioned a second lieutenant of the 4th Artillery. He served at Fort Foote, Md.; Fort Monroe, Va.; and at various posts in North Carolina till June 10, 1872, when he was transferred to the engineer corps, and served as assistant astronomer on the northern boundary of the United States till 1876. He was promoted to first lieutenant, Jan. 13, 1874. He was military attache to the United States legation at St. Petersburg in 1877-79, and during the Russo-Turkish War was with the Russian army, being present at the battles of Shipka Pass, Plevna, the passage of the Balkans, Taskosen, Sofia, and Philopopolis. For bravery in several of these battles he received the Orders of St. Anne and St. Vladimir, and a campaign medal from the Emperor of Russia. In 1879-85 he was assistant to the engineer commiss
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Philippine Islands, (search)
Philippine Islands, An archipelago between the Pacific Ocean and the China Sea; formerly belonging to Spain, and ceded to the United States for $20,000,000 by the treaty of peace between the United States and Spain in 1898. The following Memoranda by Maj.-Gen. Francis V. Greene, U. S. V., forming Senate document no. 62, of the 55th Congress, 3d session, gives a succinct statement of the islands, their people, productions, and commerce, when they came into our possession. Area and population. These islands, including the Ladrones, Carolines, and Palaos, which are all under the government of Manila, are variously estimated at from 1,200 to 1,800 in number. The greater portion are small and are of no more value than the islands off the coast of Alaska. The important islands are less than a dozen in number, and 90 per cent. of the Christian population live on Luzon and the five principal islands of the Visayas group. The total population is somewhere between 7,000,000 and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wake Island, (search)
Wake Island, An island in the North Pacific Ocean, about midway between Hawaii and Hong-Kong. On July 4, 1898, Gen. Francis V. Greene, with a few officers, while en route to Manila, went ashore on the island, made observations, found no traces of inhabitants, planted a record of possession, and raised the flag of the United States. On General Greene's report the United States government determined to take formal possession of the island, which was not known to have been inhabited for more than sixty years. Instructions were, accordingly, given to Commander Taussig, of the Bennington, and on Jan. 17, 1899, that officer and his crew made a landing and erected a flagstaff. When this was in place the sailors were formed in two ranks, facing seaward, and, having called all to witness that the island was not in the possession of any other nation, Commander Taussig ordered the American flag to be raised by Ensign Wettengell. Upon reaching the truck the flag was saluted by twenty-on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
leton made his impress on the age in which he lived, and will be sadly missed, not only in Lexington, but in the State and land which he loved so well and served so faithfully. General B. G. Humphries, of Miss., has also joined the column which has crossed over the river to rest under the shade of the trees, leaving behind him the stainless name of a gallant soldier, a true patriot, an able statesman, a noble man. Peace to his ashes! Literary notices. The Mississippi. By Francis Vinton Greene, constituting Volume VIII, of the series of Campaigns of the Civil War, issued by Charles Scribner's Sons, has been sent us by the publishers and will be fully reviewed, by a competent hand, at no distant day. Meantime, we advise our friends to put all of the volumes of this series on their Library shelves as fair representations of the Federal side. And we again repeat, that if Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons desire to prove their claim to impartiality in publishing Campaigns of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. The Mississippi. By Francis Vinton Greene, constituting Volume VIII, of the series of Campaigns of the Civil War, issued by Charles Scribner's Sons, has been sent us by the publishers and will be fully reviewed, by a competent hand, at no distant day. Meantime, we advise our friends to put all of the volumes of this series on their Library shelves as fair representations of the Federal side. And we again repeat, that if Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons desire to prove their claim to impartiality in publishing Campaigns of the Civil War, they must now arrange for a similar series from some of our ablest Confederate soldiers. the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. By, George E. Pond,. Associate Editor of the Army and Navy Journal, has been received (through Messrs. West & Johnston, of Richmond), and constitutes Volume XI, of the same series. We have not yet had opportunity of reading the volume, but shall do so at our earliest convenience (in connection with a re