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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 138 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 20 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for George W. Greene or search for George W. Greene in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Virginia, (search)
I see one army branching into thirteen, which, instead of looking up to Congress as the supreme controlling power of the United States, are considering themselves as dependent on their George Mason. several States. Towards the end of June General Greene wrote: The Congress have lost their influence. I have for a long time seen the necessity of some new plan of civil government. Unless there is some control over the States by the Congress, we shall soon be like a broken band. The maraudiof tobacco, which had been collected there for Monticello. shipment to France on account of the Congress. There were virtually no troops in Virginia to oppose this invasion, for all that were really fit for service had been sent to the army of Greene, in the Carolinas. Steuben had about 500 halfstarved and naked troops, whom he was training for recruits. These were mostly without arms, and retreated before Phillips to Richmond. Lafayette, who had halted at Annapolis, now hurried forward, a