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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Geiger, Emily 1760- (search)
Geiger, Emily 1760- Heroine; born in South Carolina about 1760. While General Greene was pursuing Lord Rawdon towards Orangeburg, he wished to send a message to General Sumter, then on the Santeert. Emily Geiger, a girl of eighteen years of age, volunteered to carry the letter to Sumter. Greene told her its contents, so that, in case she found it necessary to destroy it, the message might assing through a dry swamp, was arrested by some Tory scouts. As she came from the direction of Greene's army, her errand was suspected. She was taken to a house at the edge of a swamp, and a woman employed to search her. When left alone, she ate up Greene's letter, piece by piece, and no evidence being found against her, she was released with many apologies. She passed on to Sumter's camp, andagainst her, she was released with many apologies. She passed on to Sumter's camp, and very soon he and Marion were co-operating with Greene. Emily afterwards married a rich planter on the Congaree.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Germantown, battle of. (search)
ill, while Armstrong, with Pennsylvania militia, made a circuit to gain the left and rear of the enemy. The divisions of Greene and Stephen, flanked by McDougall's brigade (two-thirds of the whole army), moved on a circuitous route to attack the fros check in the pursuit brought back Wayne's division, leaving Sullivan's flank uncovered. This event, and the failure of Greene to attack at the time ordered, disconcerted Washington's plans. Greene's troops had fallen into confusion in the fog, asGreene's troops had fallen into confusion in the fog, as they traversed the broken country, but they soon smote the British right with force. The failure of the other troops to co-operate with them by turning the British left caused Greene to fail, and the golden opportunity to strike a crushing blow hadGreene to fail, and the golden opportunity to strike a crushing blow had passed. In the fog that still prevailed, parties of Americans attacked each other on the field; and it was afterwards ascertained that, while the assault on Chew's house was in progress, the whole British army were preparing to fly across the Sch
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Glover, John 1732-1797 (search)
Glover, John 1732-1797 Military officer; born in Salem, Mass., Nov. 5, 1732; at the beginning of the Revolution raised 1,000 men at Marblehead and joined the army at Cambridge. His regiment, being composed almost wholly of fishermen, was called the Amphibious Regiment, and in the retreat from Long Island it manned the boats. It also manned the boats at the crossing of the Delaware before the victory at Trenton. Glover was made brigadier-general in February, 1777, and joined the Northern army under General Schuyler. He did good service in the campaign of that year, and led Burgoyne's captive troops to Cambridge. He was afterwards with Greene in New Jersey, and Sullivan in Rhode Island. He died in Marblehead, Jan. 30, 1797.