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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In the monitor turret. (search)
y of her sinking at sea, volunteered to go in her, and, at my request, was ordered. From the date of his orders he applied himself unremittingly and intelligently to the study of her peculiar qualities and to her fitting and equipment. . . Lieutenant Greene, after taking his place in the pilot-house and finding the injuries there less serious than I had supposed, had turned the vessel's head again in the direction of the enemy to continue the engagement; but before he could get at close quarteontinue the engagement; but before he could get at close quarters with her she retired. He therefore very properly returned to the Minnesota arid lay by her until she floated. . . . Lieutenant Greene, the executive officer, had charge in the turret, and handled the guns with great courage, coolness, and skill; and throughout the engagement, as in the equipment of the vessel and on her passage to Hampton Roads, he exhibited an earnest devotion to duty unsurpassed in my experience. editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
e opportunity of explaining the cause of Lieutenant Greene's alarm, mentioned 3. forward sectionhe Monitor from New York to Fort Monroe. Lieutenant Greene says that the sound from the anchor-well to such an extent that at sea, to quote Lieutenant Greene's report, the water entered with such foxtraordinary position that, according to Lieutenant Greene's report, a shell from the enemy's gun, afford egress for the crew.-editors. Lieutenant Greene's report with reference to the position idering that the Monitor, as reported by Lieutenant Greene, was a quick-turning vessel, the disadva Monitor. The statement published by Lieutenant Greene, that the chief engineer of the vessel i under the turret like a waterfall, says Lieutenant Greene in his report. It will be proper to obsted out by several of their commanders. Lieutenant Greene in his report to the Secretary of the Nalosing the port-stoppers, as reported by Lieutenant Greene, required the entire gun-crew. The slow[5 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.64 (search)
the painter about ten or twelve feet. The first lieutenant, S. D. Greene, and other officers in the boat were shouting, Is the captain on board? and, with severe struggles to have our voices heard above the roar of the wind and sea, we were shouting, No, and trying to haul in the boat, which we at last succeeded in doing. The captain, ever caring for his men, requested us to get in, but we both, in the same voice, told him to get in first. The moment he was over the bows of the boat Lieutenant Greene cried, Cut the painter! Cut the painter! I thought, Now or lost, and in less time than I can explain it, exerting my strength beyond imagination, I hauled in the boat, sprang, caught on the gunwale, was pulled into the boat with a boat-hook in the hands of one of the men, and took my seat with one of the oarsmen. The other man, named Thomas Joice, managed to get into the boat in some way, I cannot tell how, and he was the last man saved from that ill-fated ship. As we were cut loos
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
er fire recommenced. During the time between the fall of Lieut. Worden and the arrival of Lieut. Greene in the pilot house, the Monitor was entirely under control of the man at the wheel, who haviy in his work, The blockade and the cruisers, and he obtained his information from the late Commander Greene. Lieut. George U. Morris. ´╝łActing commander of the Cumberland.) Prof. Soley further worst, and made ready to destroy his ship; but at this point the Merrimac withdrew to Norfolk. Greene fired at her twice, or at most three times. He then returned to the Minnesota, and remained by sland. In writing history it is no more than fair that both sides should have a hearing. Lieut. Greene, in his report to the Secretary of the Navy, dated March 12, 1862. says: At 8 A. M. perhort time after Lieut. Worden was wounded, the Monitor headed away from her antagonist until Lieut. Greene could get into the pilot-house, and the commanding officer of the Merrimac took advantage of
299, 347. Greely, A. W.: VIII., 9, 312, 342, 343; X., 25. Green, A. J., I., 103. Green, C., VI., 119. Green, E., VIII., 153 Green, M. E., X., 151. Green, T.: II., 334, 342, 346, 352; VI., 147; X., 153. Green Chapel, Ky., II., 328. Green Mountain Boys: at drill, VIII., 64, 65. Green River, Ky., IV., 148. Greenbrier, W. Va., I., 352. Greene, F. V., VIII., 192. Greene, G. S.: II., 61, 65, 70, 256; IX., 213; X., 305. Greene, S. D., VI., 36, 159, 174, 176. Greenhow, R., VII., 200. Greenhow, Mrs. Rose O., and daughter, VII., 31, 67, 200, 289. Greenleaf, C. H., VII., 223, 224. Greenpoint, N. Y., VI., 312. Greenville, La., water tank at, IV., 59 seq., 328. Greenville, Tenn.: III., 330; IV., 176. Greenwalt, C., VII., 181. Greer, E., X., 313. Greer, H. I., VIII., 117. Greer, R, W., VIII., 117. Gregg, D. McM.: III., 324, 328, 330, 332, 338, 340, 342; IV.,