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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In the monitor turret. (search)
ssession of the field., ; My men and myself were perfectly black with smoke and powder. All my underclothes were perfectly black, and my person was in the same condition .... I had been up so long, and been under such a state of excitement, that my nervous system was completely run down. . . . My nerves and muscles twitched as though electric shocks were continually passing through them. . . . I lay down and tried to sleep---I might as well have tried to fly. From a private letter of Lieutenant Greene, written just after the fight.-editors. In this engagement Captain Worden displayed the highest qualities as an officer and man. He was in his prime (forty-four years old), and carried with him the ripe experience of twenty-eight years in the naval service. He joined the ship a sick man, having but recently left a prison in the South. He was nominated for the command by the late Admiral Joseph Smith, and the result proved the wisdom of the choice. Having accepted his orders agai
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
p reconstructed as an armored vessel. Her advent in Hampton Roads, March 8, 1862, where in the first moment were but some wooden ships, among them the large steam frigate Minnesota and the sailing frigates Congress and Cumberland, brought on a memorably heroic fight, in which the Congress was burned and the Cumberland sunk with her colors flying. That night came almost providentially the Monitor, with her heroic commander, Lieutenant Worden, and her equally courageous first lieutenant, S. Dana Greene. The fight of the next day, its outcome, the withdrawal of the Merrimac, her later destruction by the Confederates, and the effect upon the world, we all know. Besides saving to the Union the possession of Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay, it saved a possible appearance of what, up to that moment, was an irresistible force off Northern ports, the appearance of which would have had a disastrous effect upon Federal interests in the development of European action in favor of the South.
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
lmost immediately she replied with her broadside, and Lieutenant Greene and his gunners listened anxiously to the shells burslties of breakdowns by the new untried machinery, Lieutenant S. Dana Greene coolly directed his men, who kept up a fire of ree, thrice on the deck, and eight times on the side. While Greene was fighting nobly in the turret, Worden with the helmsmanhuge antagonist. Twice he almost succeeded and both times Greene's guns were used on the Virginia at point-blank range withpeepholes in the pilot-house and the command devolved upon Greene. Worden, even in his agony of pain while the doctor was ahich was still aground. It was midnight before Lieutenant S. Dana Greene, sent by Worden, reached the Minnesota and reportllowed is familiar reading. Inside the turret, where Lieutenant Greene, First Master Stodder and Chief Engineer Stimers werede signal to the Monitor to attack the enemy, but, as Lieutenant Greene has said, in referring to this order, The signal was
62, p. 4, col. 5; March 12, p. 4, col. 5; March 13, p. 2, col. 3, p. 4, col. 7. — – Account of eye-witness. Boston Evening Journal, March 18, 1862, p. 2, cols. 3, 4. — – Advent of the ironclads. United Service Mag., vol. 1, p. 586. — – Battle with the Merrimac. In Current events. Harper's Mon., vol. 24, p. 837. — – Controversy about responsibility for action. John D. Champlin, Jr., and Ad. Marston. N. Y. Nation, vol. 35, pp. 378, 461, 508. — – In the turret of the. Com. S. Dana Greene. Century, vol. 29, p. 754. — – Services of the Merrimac (Virginia); account of the engagement at Hampton Roads; from Southern Hist. Soc. papers. Capt. Catesby Ap R. Jones, executive officer of the Merrimac. United Service Mag., vol. 8, p. 660. — – Southern account. Boston Evening Journal, March 15, 1862, p. 4, col. 2. — – Watching the Merrimac. R. E. Colston, C. S. A. Century, vol. 29, p. 763. — – John Taylor Wood, lieutenant on the Merrim
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
Green, F. C., 382 Green, F. M., 62 Green, G. S., 214, 287, 528 Green, H. M., 489 Green, J. A., 287 Green, J. E., 287 Green, J. F., 287 Green, J. G., 62 Green, J. W., 287 Green, Milbrey, 214, 287, 528 Green, N. St. J., 419 Green, Reuben, 582 Green, S. A., 382, 528 Green, W. H., 62 Green, W. N., Jr., 181, 419, 467, 528 Greene, C. W., 468, 489 Greene, F. C., 62 Greene, F. V., 656 Greene, F. W., 656 Greene, J. D., 181, 214, 419, 528 Greene, Paul, 62 Greene, R. H., 62 Greene, S. D., 656 Greene, S. E., 287 Greene, W. B., 214, 419 Greenleaf, H. S., 215 Greenleaf, J. W., 287 Greenleaf, Westover, 287 Greenough, W. S., 468, 529 Greenwood, G. H., 656 Gregerson, J. R., 287 Gregg, W. W., 62 Gregory, F. F., 62 Gregory, J. H., 62 Gregory, Joseph, Jr., 62 Gregory, M. B., 62 Gregory, S. B., 62 Gregory, W. D., 62 Grew, Henry, Mrs., 582 Grey, Jeremiah, 582 Griffin, C. N., 287 Griffin, Daniel, 287 Griffin, G. B., 62 Griffin, John, 62 Griffith, T. B., 287
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
the Monitor. He was ordered on January 13, while the vessel was still on the stocks. Lieutenant S. Dana Greene volunteered to go in her, and at Worden's request was ordered as executive officer. Twas able to see the course of the action and to direct the working of the ship and of the guns. Greene had charge of the turret and handled the battery. These two men fought the ship. Acting-Masterw and imperfect communication by passing the word, when minutes and even seconds were important, Greene fought under heavy disadvantages. The direction of the bow and stern and of the starboard and p was some minutes before word was passed to the turret of the disaster in the pilot-house. When Greene came out and passed forward he found the captain at the foot of the ladder, stunned and helplessy to destroy his ship. But, at this point, the Merrimac withdrew to Norfolk. As she moved off, Greene fired at her twice, or at most three times. He then returned to the Minnesota, and remained by
. Florida, the, fights the Massachusetts, 132; runs blockade of Mobile, 137 et seq., 184 et seq.; captured at Bahia, 187 Flusser, Lieutenant-Commander, 97; killed, 98 Fisher, Fort, 90 Fox, Captain Gustavus V., 61 (note), 66 (note), 234 et seq. Freeborn, the, 86 Galveston, Tex., blockaded, 35, 140 et seq., 143 et seq. Georgetown, 87 et seq. Georgia, the, built, 214; cruises, 214 et seq.; sold, 215 Goldsborough, Commodore L. M., 60, 76 et seq., 90 et seq. Greene, Lieutenant, S. Dana, on Monitor, 56, 69 Gunboats built, 19 Guns, naval, before and during the war, 2,15; loss of, at Norfolk, 54 Hampton Roads, blockaded, 47, 82, 85 Handy, Captain, Robert, 125, 131 Harriet Lane, 143, 144 (note), 146 et seq.; captured, 148 Hatteras Inlet, 90 Hatteras, the, 150; fights Alabama, 195 et seq. Havana, a port for blockaderun-ners, 37 Housatonic, the, 111 Huntsville, the, 122, 136 ironclads at the outbreak of the war, 2 Iroquois, the, 11; ch
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
This second withdrawal was most probably coincident with the following fact, given by Lieutenant S. Dana Greene, the executive officer of the Monitor, page 725-727, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, volume I. Lieutenant Greene says: Another account. Soon after noon a shell from the Merrimac's gun, the muzzle of which was not ten yards distant, struck the forward side of the pilothousearily retired from the action to ascertain the extent of the injuries she had received. Lieutenant Greene, then succeeding to the command, continues his account. In the confusion of the moment thto pursue, it is impossible to state; but it could hardly have exceeded twenty minutes. Lieutenant Greene admits that being summoned to Worden, he found him standing at the foot of the ladder leadeport of Captain Van Brunt, of the Minnesota, discloses the retirement of the Monitor, and Lieutenant Greene, her executive, admits that she withdrew twice from the engagement—once to hoist shot into
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
oss, considering the numbers engaged, was almost unprecedented. General Beauregard, in his official report, estimates it at three thousand, as eight hundred dead bodies were buried by the Confederates in front of Wagner the following morning. If this is a correct estimate, it will be seen that the Federals lost twice as many men as there were troops in the Confederate garrison. Among their killed were Colonel R. G. Shaw of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts, Colonel H. S. Putnam and Lieutenant-Colonel Greene, of the Seventh New Hampshire. Brigadier-General G. C. Strong and Colonel J. L. Chatfield, of the Sixth Connecticut, were mortally wounded; BrigadierGene-ral Seymour, commanding, Colonels W. B. Barton, A. C. Voris, J. H. Jackson and S. Emory, were among the wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Bedell, Third New Hampshire, and Major Filler, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania, were among the prisoners. The Confederate loss in killed and wounded was only one hundred and seventy-four, but the loss on b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
table and bloody contests, where your citizen soldiers won enduring laurels over England's best disciplined forces. The glorious victory at King's Mountain, occurring as it did at a most gloomy period of the Revolution, when the hopes of patriots had been prostrated and the enemies of America encouraged by the disaster of Camden, turned the tide in the South in favor of the patriot cause as did the victory of Trenton under Washington at the North. The battle of Guilford Courthouse, where Greene measured swords with Cornwallis, was an important struggle, where great military genius and valor contended for mastery, and where the cause of the whole country seemed to be in jeopardy. The heroism of your forefathers made your soil an uncomfortable abiding place for British soldiers. But it is unnecessary to repeat in your presence the story of the American Revolution, because you are as familiar with it as household words. Next to the story of the Saviour it is the first one you tea
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