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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 138 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 85 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 82 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 47 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Irvin Gregg or search for Irvin Gregg in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
on advanced to Middleburg, where a part of Stuart's force was posted, and was attacked by Colonel Irvin Gregg's Brigade. Here, as at Aldie, the fight was very obstinate. The enemy had carefully selkirmishers, owing to the unfavorable character of the country for mounted service. On the 19th, Gregg's Division moved on the turnpike from Middleburg in the direction of Upperville, and soon encountected that flank from any attack, with the assistance of General Merritt's regular brigade. General Gregg's Division, having crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, in rear of our army, passed througe merest tyro in the art of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg, with two of his brigades (Colonels McIntosh and Irvin Gregg), and Custer's Brigade of the TIrvin Gregg), and Custer's Brigade of the Third Division, and, on a fair field, there was another trial between two cavalry forces, in which most of the fighting was done in the saddle, and with the trooper's favorite weapon — the sabre. Wi
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
d designated, when a staff officer of Brigadier General Gregg, commanding Second Division, ordered l and his guns, at the same time informing General Gregg of the state of affairs, that he was engagtly superior force, and requesting that Colonel Irvin Gregg's Brigade be sent up at the trot to supm. That brigade was yet some distance off, and Gregg, meeting Custer on the march in the opposite doved up at once to Mcintosh's support, and General Gregg, coming upon the field, took command of thirst Maryland prepared for such an emergency. Gregg, however, upon coming on the field, had moved skirmishers rallied and fell into line. Then Gregg rode over to the First Michigan, which, as it r's Brigade was ordered to join its division. Gregg remained all night in possession of the field,bly heavy, but have not been ascertained. General Gregg reported the losses in his division to be ed and forty-two. It has been claimed that Gregg's fight at Gettysburg was the finest cavalry f[1 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee and Grant in the Wilderness. (search)
rmanna ford road, and went into bivouac. Sedgwick's (Sixth) Corps crossed later in the afternoon, and camped near the ford. Wilson's cavalry advanced up the old pike to watch any move of the Confederates from that quarter. Hancock, preceded by Gregg's cavalry, crossed at Ely's ford, and by nine A. M. on the 4th, was at Chancellorsville; there went into bivouac, having thrown the cavalry forward toward Todd's Tavern and Fredericksburg. It is well to observe how accurately posted General L, that had been much separated, for convenience of passing the winter, was now being concentrated as it converged upon the enemy; and all in good spirits, notwithstanding the heavy odds known to be against them. Early in the morning of the 5th, Gregg's cavalry was ordered toward Hamilton's crossing, and the Second Corps moved toward Shady Grove, its right reaching out in the direction of the Fifth Corps, under orders for Parker's store, on the plank road. Warren's (Fifth) Corps moved toward
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
, October 20th, 1877: I would remind General Gregg that the last charge in the cavalry battlee enemy back in case he should attack. Again, Gregg's report says: Other charges were made by the the enemy withdrew to his left, etc. If, then, Gregg succeeded in resisting the attack made upon hivalor and intrepidity of his troopers. But in Gregg, he had a Roland for his Oliver, and in a fairnowledgment that after the first charge, which Gregg admits was not successfully met by the Seventhuction. Stuart's was the attacking force. If Gregg had been driven from the field, why did not Stin Stuart's report to prove the correctness of Gregg's. The facts summed up, then, are these: S the Federal line of battle, but, encountering Gregg's command, after a stubborn fight, in which thSouthern cavalry, and that by this charge his (Gregg's) division was swept behind the protection oft's report was made, but before it reached General Gregg's artillery the attacking column was in fl[16 more...]