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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 52 6 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for J. Irvin Gregg or search for J. Irvin Gregg in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
rps respectively. The Third Brigade, commanded by Colonel J. Irvin Gregg, of the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, consisted dering around the country entirely on its own account. General Gregg took it along with him, and showed it some marching whie evening, in accordance with orders from headquarters, General Gregg withdrew the skirmish line, substituting a picket line he two brigades thereon. On the morning of July 3d, General Gregg was directed to resume his position on the right of theg his position of the previous day on the Bonaughtown road, Gregg placed his two brigades to the left of Custer's line, cover of the Eleventh Corps, to General Meade, was placed in General Gregg's hands, notifying him that a large body of the enemy'ss cavalry without its being observed from our position. Gregg's position was as inferior to Stuart's as the general line about three miles east of Gettysburg. The force under Gregg numbered about five thousand men, though not more than thre