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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 52 6 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for J. Irvin Gregg or search for J. Irvin Gregg in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
N., as commander. Interior of Fort Putnam, formerly the Confederate Battery Gregg, Cumming's Point, S. C. From a photograph. As a corollary to this engagemeswered but slowly to this terrible onslaught. Not so, however, with Sumter and Gregg, which fired with even more rapidity than the enemy, and, as ever, did splendidconstruction on the mainland were unfinished, I had resolved to hold Wagner and Gregg to the last extremity. Every movement of the enemy was in the meantime watched with the utmost vigilance, while the accurate firing of Sumter, Gregg, and Wagner continued seriously to interfere with the working parties engaged on his lines of sion of it would result in the useless loss of the garrisons of both Wagner and Gregg. The enemy's sap had reached the moat of the former work. The heavy Parrott so some defect in the fuses, however, the powder magazines of neither Wagner nor Gregg were exploded, although they had been lit, with all due precaution, by able off
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
g fire would have been most demoralizing, and might have been enough so to have produced, a different result. From this time until the abandonment of Wagner and Gregg, hardly a day passed without urgent appeals for the assistance of the fleet from the commanding general, who was at times apprehensive of a sortie from the fort. could not show a finger. About daylight on the 7th a message was received by the admiral from army headquarters, stating that the enemy had evacuated Wagner and Gregg, and that Morris Island was in our possession. The news spread quickly, and afloat and ashore speculation was rife as to what the next move would be and how the ge fort that night. After the war General Beauregard wrote me two letters on the subject of the attack, in which he says, in effect: After the fall of Wagner and Gregg, acting under the belief that our forces were thereby demoralized, the enemy would doubtless make a demonstration against Sumter. Our impression to this effect wa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
ing the opposite side. The panic created by his first entrance within the outer works of Richmond having subsided, troops were sent out to attack his rear. He was now in a perilous position; one from which but few generals could have extricated themselves. The defenses of Richmond, manned, were to the right, the Chickahominy was to the left, with no bridge remaining, and the opposite bank guarded; to the rear was a force from Richmond. This force was attacked and beaten by Wilson's and Gregg's divisions, while Sheridan turned to the left with the remaining division and hastily built a bridge over the Chickahominy under the fire of the enemy, forced a crossing and soon dispersed the Confederates he found there. The enemy was held back from the stream by the fire of the troops not engaged in bridge-building. On the 13th Sheridan was at Bottom's Bridge, over the Chickahominy. On the 14th he crossed this stream, and on that day went into camp on the James River at Haxall's Land
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
Longstreet, charged with his whole command, swept his front, and captured the works. Nearly at the same moment Field's division took the left of the road, with Gregg's brigade in front, Benning's behind it, Law's next, and Jenkins's following. As the Texans in the front line swept past the batteries where General Lee was standck. We won't go on unless you go back, was the general cry. One of the men dropped to the rear, and taking the bridle turned the general's horse around, while General Gregg came up and urged him to do as the Capture of a part of the burning Union breastworks on the Brock road on the afternoon of May 6. from a sketch made at the's corps] were advancing through the pines with apparently resistless force, when Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins, C. S. A., killed May 6, 86. from Tintype. Gregg's eight hundred Texans, regardless of numbers, flanks, or supports, dashed directly upon them. There was a terrific crash, mingled with wild yells, which settled
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
and evening, May 4, 1864. Mine Ford. These three fords cover about seven miles of the Rapidan River,which in general flows south-east. Hancock, preceded by Gregg's cavalry, crossed at Ely's Ford and moved to Chancellorsville, which placed him on the left, or south-east, side of the Wilderness battle-field. Warren, with Wilo'clock, my brigade (of Gibbon's division) was ordered to relieve General Getty. When I advanced I immediately became engaged with Field's division, consisting of Gregg's, Benning's, Law's, and Jenkins's brigades, on the north side of the Orange Plank road. Just before 5 o'clock the right of the line under Sedgwick was attackedMiles to make a reconnoissance down the Catharpin road toward Corbin's Bridge, about two miles distant. Miles had his own brigade, one battery, and one brigade of Gregg's cavalry. He found Hampton's cavalry, and held them at bay until 5:30 P. M. While returning, Miles was attacked by Mahone's infantry, and was compelled to call u
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
s Q. Anderson. Reserve Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wesley Merritt: 19th N. Y. (1st Dragoons), Col. Alfred Gibbs; 6th Pa., Maj. James Starr; 1st U. S., Capt. Nelson B. Sweitzer; 2d U. S., Capt. T. F. Rodenbough; 5th U. S., Capt. Abraham K. Arnold. Second division, Brig.-Gen. David McM. Gregg. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry E. Davies. Jr.: 1st Mass., Maj. Lucius M. Sargent; 1st N. J., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kester; 6th Ohio, Col. William Stedluan; 1st Pa., Col. John P. Taylor. Second Brigade, Col. J. Irvin Gregg: 1st Me., Col. Charles H. Smith; 10th N. Y., Maj. M. Henry Avery; 2d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Brinton; 4th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George H. Covode; 8th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Samuel Wilson; 16th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John K. Robison. Third division, Brig.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 8th Ill. (detachment), Lieut. William W. Long. First Brigade, Col. Timothy M. Bryan, Jr., Col. John B. McIntosh: 1st Conn., Maj. Erastus Blakeslee; 2d.N. Y., Col. Otto Harhaus; 5th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John Hammond;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
kins: 1st S. C., Col. James R. Hagood: 2d S. C. (Rifles), Col. R. E. Bowen; 5th S. C., Col. A. Coward; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Joseph Walker. Anderson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George T. Anderson: 7th Ga.,----; 8th Ga.,----; 9th Ga.,----; 11th Ga.,----; 59th Ga., Lieut.-Col. B. H. Gee. Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. McIver Law: 4th Ala., Col. P. D. Bowles; 15th Ala.,----; 44th Ala., Col. W. F. Perry; 47th Ala.,----; 48th Ala., Lieut.-Col. W. M. Hardwick. Gregg's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Gregg: 3d Ark., Col. Van H. Manning; 1st Tex.,----; 4th Tex., Col. J. P. Bane; 5th Tex., Lieut.-Col. K. Bryan; Benning's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry L. Benning: 2d Ga.,----; 15th Ga., Col. D. M. DuBose; 17th Ga.,----20th Ga.,----. artillery, Brig.-Gen. E. Porter Alexander. Huger's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. Frank Huger: Fickling's (Va.) Battery; Moody's (La.) Battery; Parker's (Va.) Battery; J. D. Smith's (Va.) Battery; Taylor's (Va.) Battery; Woolfolk's (Va.) Batt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
pt. Nelson B. Sweitzer; 2d U. S., Capt. Theophilus F. Rodenbough; 5th U. S. Co's B, F, and K, under Capt. Julius W. Mason, detailed as escort to Lieut.-Gen. U. S. Grant. Capt. Abraham K. Arnold. Second division, Brig.-Gen. David McM. Gregg. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry E. Davies, Jr.: 1st Mass., Lieut.-Col. Samuel E. Chamberlain; 1st N. J., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kester; 10th N. Y., Maj. M. Henry Avery; 6th Ohio, Col. William Stedman; 1st Pa., Col. John P. Taylor. Second Brigade, Col. J. Irvin Gregg: 1st Me., Col. Charles H. Smith; 2d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Brinton; 4th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George H. Covode; 8th Pa., Col. Pennock Huey; 13th Pa., Maj. Michael Kerwin; 16th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John K. Robison. Third division, Brig.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 8th Ill. (detachment), Lieut. William W. Long. First Brigade, Col. John B. Mcintosh: 1st Conn., Maj. George O. Marcy: 3d N. J., Col. Andrew J. Morrison; 2d N. Y., Col. Otto Harhaus; 5th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John Hammond; 2d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Richmond raid. (search)
ral A. T. A. Torbert was assigned to command the First Division, with General G. A. Custer, Colonel T. C. Devin, and General Wesley Merritt as brigade commanders; General D. McM. Gregg to the Second Division, with General H. E. Davies and Colonel J. Irvin Gregg to brigades; General J. H. Wilson to the Third Division, with Colonels J. B. Mcintosh and G. H. Chapman to brigades. To each division were attached two batteries of horse artillery, with the same number as a reserve. Sheridan's lieutenants were well chosen. Torbert had already distinguished himself as an infantry commander; Gregg had come from the regular cavalry and possessed the confidence of the whole corps for good judgment and coolness; Wilson, promoted from the corps of engineers, was very quick and impetuous; Merritt was a pupil of the Cooke-Buford school, with cavalry virtues well proportioned, and to him was given the Reserve Brigade of regulars — the Old Guard. Custer was the meteoric sabreur; McIntosh, the last
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
e consisting of the 1st, 5th, 6th, and 7th Michigan Cavalry, commanded by Brigadier-General G. A. Custer; the Second Brigade, 4th, 6th, and 9th New York Cavalry and 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry, commanded by Colonel T. C. Devin. The Second Division, commanded by General David McM. Gregg, was composed of two brigades, the First, commanded by General H. E. Davies, consisted of the 1st Massachusetts, 1st New Jersey, 10th New York, and 1st Pennsylvania. The Second Brigade was commanded by Colonel J. Irvin Gregg, and consisted of the 2d Pennsylvania, 4th Pennsylvania, 8th Pennsylvania, 13th Pennsylvania, and 16th Pennsylvania, making twenty-two regiments in the two divisions. Sheridan had four batteries of horse artillery, Batteries H and I, 1st United States (Regulars), Battery D, 2d United States, and Battery M, 2d United States. The returns of May 31st, 1864, show 450 officers and 9889 men present for duty in the First and Second divisions, making a total of 10,337 officers and men.
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