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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
edford south of Mystic river was set off from the town of Charlestown. Mr. James B. Gregg bought the property formerly occupied by the lumber yard, and removed thethe upper part, and the second story contained Henry Mitchell's barber shop. Mr. Gregg occupied the lower floor for his grocery and grain business. Another largell and Edward Copp, house and carriage painters, had a shop above. To enable Mr. Gregg to reach his store from Main street, a bridge was built over the old runway to the river. It was in Gregg's stable that the great fire of 1850 began. When Mr. Gregg took possession of the northern half of James' yard, Mr. Benjamin Moore mMr. Gregg took possession of the northern half of James' yard, Mr. Benjamin Moore moved his blacksmith shop from the other side of the street to the southerly part of the yard, and his family moved from Union street to the Joseph James house. MrFall, a shipsmith, and J. T. Barker, a teamster, took the teaming business of Mr. Gregg after his death. The latter was killed by being caught between two cars whil
46; Charles Cummings, 1846–‘76; Lorin L. Dame, 1876-1903; Leonard J. Manning, 1903. Errata. Vol. 6, last five lines p. 17, and first two lines p. 18 should read: Mr. [Benjamin] Moore, in company with John Fall, a shipsmith, and J. T. Barker, a teamster, took the business of Alexander Gregg (see vol. 5, p. 93) after his death. Mr. Moore was killed by being caught between two cars while unloading freight at the Boston & Lowell railroad in West Medford. Mr. James Winneck succeeded Mr. James B. Gregg in the grocery business. Medford in 1847. [The following paper was read by Mr. Charles Cummings before the Medford Historical Society, November 17, 1902. The first part of this paper was devoted to the churches. The history of the various religious organizations has been, or will be, given in detail in the Register, and is therefore omitted here.—editor.] Schools. AT Symmes Corner, which was a part of Medford till the incorporation of Winchester in 1850, a primary schoo<
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Baptist Church of Medford. (search)
wn fireman had his foot cut open with an axe, but we could not learn his name. We did not learn of any lives lost, except that of the child mentioned above. Below will be found a list of the buildings destroyed, and their occupants, as near as we could collect them, for which we are under obligations to Mr. Daniel Lawrence and other citizens of Medford. The fire was first discovered in the upper story of the Widow Gregg's stable on the west side of Main street, near the bridge. Mrs. Gregg's whole estate was totally destroyed, consisting of three dwellings and one stable. The houses were principally occupied by Irish families. One yoke of oxen, one horse, one cow and several swine were destroyed with the stable. Next to the Gregg estate was Timothy Cotting's house, blacksmith shop and two stables, totally destroyed. Mr. Nathan Barker occupied part of the dwelling. Mr. George Lynne's Symmes. house, blacksmith shop and stable came next and were also destroyed. The Mi