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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 202 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Maxey Gregg or search for Maxey Gregg in all documents.

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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 16: (search)
nt, and, tying the ribbon around his cap, galloped off with us to the front, where we hastened to take our position on the extreme right. On our way we met General Maxey Gregg, a gallant officer from South Carolina, with whom I exchanged a few words of friendly greeting for the last time, as a few hours afterwards he was a corpse.h their pursuers, with whom they became indiscriminately mingled, whereby was caused inevitable confusion and great loss of life on our side. Here the gallant General Gregg fell mortally wounded while attempting to rally his men. Our reserves speedily coming up, however, with the right wing of Early's division, the Yankees were resion, and had fallen during the first attack in the morning on the spot where our lines had for some time been broken. We had to mourn the loss of two general officers, Maxey Gregg of South Carolina, and Thomas R. R. Cobb of Georgia, who fell on Marye's Heights. At his side General Cooke, a brother of Mrs Stuart, was dangerously