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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 202 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maxey Gregg or search for Maxey Gregg in all documents.

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ht McClellan advanced a battery and shelled them from the bills. The dead and wounded found this morning evidence the ability of our signal officers in directing the of the guns. On discovering the movement of the enemy, early this morning General Pleasanton was dispatched in lot quaint, with two batteries and two regiments of infantry, through a gap of high hills, and he succeeded in cutting off a large amount of their ammunition, supplies, &c, besides a small portion of General Maxey Gregg's South Carolina brigade. General Pleasant on shelled the enemy with effect as they passed through the ravine. The last seen of the enemy they were flying in the direction of Winchester, and it is supposed they would retreat precipitately on to Richmond. Our entire army had crossed Antietam creek this morning, and was massed between Antietam creek and the Potomac, opposite Shepherdstown, and there was every evidence that McClellan would cross the river. The loss of