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the Heights, much to the surprise of the enemy, I think, for he did not hold on to the valuable ground as strongly as he should have done. This success not only ensured us a good supply of water, but Thirty-Sixth brigade: Colonel Daniel McCook. Eighty-Fifth Illinois, Colonel Robert S. Moore. Eighty-Sixth Illinois, Colonel David D. Irons. One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Illinois, Colonel Oscar F. Harmon. Fifty-second Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Daniel D. T. Cowen. Thirty-Seventh brigade: Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois, Captain Silas Miller. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Colonel Ambrose A. Stevens. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Charles H. Larrabee. artillery: Second Illinois Light Battery, I. Captain Charles M. Barnett. First Missouri Light Battery, G. Captain Henry Hescock. also, later in the day, had an important bearing in the battle of Perryville. After taking the Heights, I brought up the rest of my division and intrenc
e Murfreesboroa pike, to Mill Creek, distant from Nashville about seven miles. While we were in camp on Mill Creek the army was reorganized, and General Joshua W. Sill, at his own request, was assigned to my division, and took command of Colonel Nicholas Greusel's brigade. My division became at the same time the Third Division, Right Wing, Fourteenth Army Corps, its three brigades of four regiments each being respectively commanded by General Sill, Colonel Frederick Schaefer and Colonel Dan McCis services to the Government, and soon rose to the colonelcy of the Thirty-Third Ohio Volunteers, and afterward to the rank of brigadier-general. I knew him well, and was glad that he came to my division, though I was very loth to relieve Colonel Greusel, of the Thirty-Sixth Illinois, who had already indicated much military skill and bravery, and at the battle of Perryville had handled his men with the experience of a veteran. Sill's modesty and courage were exceeded only by a capacity that
g through his upper lip and penetrating the brain. Although this was a heavy loss, yet the enemy's discomfiture was such as to give us an hour's time, and as Colonel Greusel, Thirty-sixth Illinois, succeeded to Sill's command, I directed him, as he took charge, to recall the brigade to its original position, for the turning-columneneral Philip H. Sheridan. escort: Second Kentucky Cavalry, Co. L. Lieutenant Joseph T. Forman. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, M