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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Joel R. Griffin or search for Joel R. Griffin in all documents.

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here this morning reports having spoken the schooner. She proved to have been a prize to the Granite City at the time that we were pursuing her. She had nearly five hundred bales of cotton on board. About one o'clock P. M., the gunboats Monongahela and Owasco, with the transport Scott--the latter with troops on board — started for the mouth of the Rio Grande on a reconnoissance, for the purpose of landing soldiers on the Texas shore. Captain J. S. Crosby, of General Banks's staff, Captain Griffin, (fleet-captain,) and Captain Strong, of the Monongahela, entered a small boat and reconnoitred the Texas coast. Finding all clear, with no enemy in sight, the order for disembarking the troops was given. The boats of the three steamers were at once lowered, making nine in all. One hundred and forty soldiers then entered them, each man being armed. After the sailors (sixty) had taken charge of the boats, they started for the shore, but in crossing the bar four were capsized, and seve
lets, provided for every contingency, and when, finally, the day was ours, was perhaps the least exultant man upon that hill. Too much praise cannot be given to any regiments engaged in this fight; but the meed of honor is more especially due to the men and officers of the Fifth Wisconsin and Sixth Maine. The help rendered by our artillery must not be forgotten. A battery of the Fifth corps, planted in a piece of woods to the left of the railway, (I am informed the battery was formerly Griffin's and afterward Hazlett's,) made some splendid shooting. On a hill running to the right of the storming party, from which hill the enemy's skirmishers were driven by Howe's skirmishers of the Second division, were planted Martin's and Waterman's batteries, and four twenty-pound Parrott guns from the reserve artillery, The rebels say that the shells from all these guns were dropped directly over their works, and were thrown with more precision than they ever before witnessed. Tandem A r
mes and enormities. You burned houses over the heads of defenceless women and children, carried off private property of every description, arrested non-combatants, and carried off ladies in irons, whom you confined with negro men. Your negro troops fired on confederates after they had surrendered, and they were only saved by the exertions of the more humane of your white officers. Last, but not least, under the pretext that he was a guerrilla, you hanged Daniel Bright, a private of company L, Sixty-second Georgia regiment, (cavalry,) forcing the ladies and gentlemen whom you held in arrest to witness the execution. Therefore, I have obtained an order from the General Commanding, for the execution of Samuel Jones, a private of company B, Fifth Ohio, whom I hang in retaliation. I hold two more of your men — in irons — as hostages for Mrs. Weeks and Mrs. Mundin. When these ladies are released, these men will be relieved and treated as prisoners of war. Joel R. Griffin, Colone