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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Joel R. Griffin or search for Joel R. Griffin in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ampbell by T. J. Morris; Dickerson by A. B. Shuford (killed); Ellis by T. Chaffin; Glenn by B. L. Hancock (killed); Wiggins by John T. Maddox; Ball by J. B. Newell. General Semmes was killed at Gettysburg. The organization of the Third regiment of Georgia volunteers, completed May 8, 1861, was as follows: Col. Ambrose R. Wright; Lieut.-Col. James S. Reid; Maj. Augustus H. Lee; Adjt. W. W. Turner; Capts. William C. Musgrove (A), R. B. Nisbet (B), R. L. McWhorter (C), C. H. Andrews (D), J. R. Griffin (E),William O. Beall (F), Edward J. Walker (G), John F. Jones (H), N. A. Carswell (I), H. C. Billups (K). The quartermaster was A. Phillips and the commissary, H. S. Hughes. This regiment served for awhile on the North Carolina coast and then in the army of Northern Virginia. There were, of course, during the long conflict, many changes in organization. Colonel Wright became a brigadier-general and finally a major-general in the army of the Confederate States. He was succeeded by Ed
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
J. A. Edmondson, (D) H. Tillman, (E) T. M. McRae, (G) T. T. Colley. This regiment was partly made up from the Seventh battalion Georgia infantry. The Sixty-second regiment Georgia volunteers organized with the following field officers: Col. Joel R. Griffin, Lieut.-Col. Randolph Towns, Maj John T. Kennedy, Commissary T. Meara, Adjt. B. B. Bowers. The captains were: (A) John P. Davis, (B) James W. Nichols, (C) W. L. A. Ellis, (D) William H. Faucett, (E), W. A. Thompson, (F) S. B. Jones, (G) Per, (I) F. G. Pitt, (K) L. W. Phillips and I. S. McAllister. The regiment returned to Virginia and took part in the final campaign that closed at Appomattox. The Eighth Georgia cavalry regiment was organized with the following officers: Col. J. R. Griffin, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Millen, Maj. J. M. Millen, Adjt. T. J. Pond; Capts. (A) J. P. Davis, (B) B. B. Bower, (C) W. L. A. Ellis, (D) T. R. Duval, (E) W. H. Thompson, (F) S. B. Jones, (G) P. Gray, (H) T. A. James, (I) A. J. Love, (K) S. L. Turne
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
, shared the important service of their commands. Among the badly wounded, says Brig.-Gen. John Pegram, was the gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Fain, of the Sixth Georgia cavalry. Capt. T. M. Merritt and his command, Company G of the Second Georgia cavalry, were Cheatham's escort, and were complimented by that officer for the efficient service rendered. The various Georgia artillery commands were prominent in such operations as this battle in the woods permitted. Capt. John Scogin's battery, Griffin light artillery, did good service. Dawson's battery had 1 man killed and 6 wounded. Capt. W. W. Havis' battery lost 1 killed and 1 wounded. In Capt. Evan P. Howell's battery 3 men were killed and 4 wounded. Capt. T. L. Massenburg lost in his battery 1 officer and 3 men wounded. Capt. T. M. Peeples, of Company D, Leyden's Ninth battalion, was engaged on Saturday, and he reported First Lieut. Thomas H. Lovelace seriously wounded in the thigh by a piece of shell, and Privates John Edmonson a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
Grant's army, 80,000 strong, occupied Chattanooga, Bridgeport and Stevenson. During 1863 two regiments of Georgia State troops were organized with E. M. Galt as colonel of the First, and R. L. Storey of the Second. These were on duty at Charleston and Savannah, and late in the year on the State railroad, guarding bridges. Several more regi. ments had been completed for the Confederate service: The Sixtieth, Col. William H. Stiles; Sixty-first, Col. John H. Lamar; Sixty-second, Col. J. R. Griffin; Sixty-third, Col. George A. Gordon; Sixty-fourth, Col. John W. Evans, and Sixty-fifth, Col. John S. Fain. Four cavalry regiments had already been formed, the First under Col. J. J. Morrison; Second, Col. W. J. Lawton; Third, Col. Martin J. Crawford; Fourth, Col. Isaac W. Avery; and in 1863 a second Fourth was organized under Col. Duncan L. Clinch; the Fifth under Col. R. H. Anderson; the Sixth under Col. John R. Hart; the Seventh, Col. E. C. Anderson, Jr.; the Eighth, Col. J. L. Mc
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ought that perhaps Slocum was making a night attack on the city. But that officer postponed his triumphal entry until later in the morning of the 2d. Stewart and Lee's corps marched all night of the 1st, and the advance of the wagon train reached McDonough, 10 miles east of Lovejoy's Station, at 2 p. m. next day. Stewart was ordered to the latter place to support Hardee; Lee, who reached McDonough on the 3d, was sent to the same destination; General Smith's State troops were ordered to Griffin, and Jackson kept his scouts out well in the direction of Greenville. Sherman on the 2d moved his army down before Hardee's position at Lovejoy's, but did not make a determined attack, and then being advised of the evacuation of Atlanta, and perceiving that he was too late to prevent the concentration of Hood's forces, abandoned his position on the 5th. Thomas' army was grouped about Atlanta, Howard's at East Point, and Schofield's at Decatur. Hood united his forces at Lovejoy's Station