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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. J. Griffin or search for R. J. Griffin in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
, Thomas C. Carrington, G. W. Clowes, J. A. Davis, J. W. Davis. S. N. Deneufville, Henry L. Dix, W. C. Durfey, W. F. Gilliam, W. G. Gatewood, Benjamin Gilliam, R. J. Griffin, J. R. Harwood, J. M. Johnson, G. W. Jackson, H. T. Jones, Jr., J. C. Lucas, W. H. Lee, Edward M. Lee, Edward Henley Lively, Robert Allen Lively, R. C. Lawson,e whole South. I there collected the Second Maryland Infantry, First Maryland Cavalry, First Maryland Artillery, Captain Dement; Second Maryland Artillery, Captain Griffin (the Baltimore Light), and the Fourth Maryland Artillery, Captain W. Scott Chew; the Third Maryland Artillery. Latrobe's Battery served in the west, and was dier Stuart threw himself on Sheridan's rear, and thus drew him away from Richmond to give time for troops to get into the city to defend it. In the ensuing fight Griffin, of course, had his battery well out of the fighting line, and it was captured by the enemy. Stuart instantly charged with a regiment and recaptured the guns. I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
ch were vital for Lee's communication with the Valley, with Richmond, and thence the whole South. I there collected the Second Maryland Infantry, First Maryland Cavalry, First Maryland Artillery, Captain Dement; Second Maryland Artillery, Captain Griffin (the Baltimore Light), and the Fourth Maryland Artillery, Captain W. Scott Chew; the Third Maryland Artillery. Latrobe's Battery served in the west, and was never in my command. The Maryland Line, thus gotten together, was the largest cot servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. With the intuition of a great soldier Stuart threw himself on Sheridan's rear, and thus drew him away from Richmond to give time for troops to get into the city to defend it. In the ensuing fight Griffin, of course, had his battery well out of the fighting line, and it was captured by the enemy. Stuart instantly charged with a regiment and recaptured the guns. In a moment they were retaken by the Federals, and Stuart again retook them. Afte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
Sabine for ammunition, and soon the little company of men set to work with great energy to prepare for the battle which they knew was imminent. General Magruder, who had been informed of the enemy's approach, sent word to Captain Odlum to spike the guns, blow up the fort, and retreat to Taylor's bayou, and there to try to hold the the enemy in check. When these orders were made known to Lieutenant Dowling-Captain Odlum being in command of the post in the town of Sabine, in place of Colonel Griffin, who had charge of the post, but who had gone to Houston to attend a court-martial—asked his men if they wished to do this. They replied: No; we prefer to fight while there is a detachment to man the guns. About this time the Federals began firing. The guns in the fort consisted of two 32-pounders, two 24-pounders, and two brass-mounted howitzers. The 31-pounders, will here be remarked, were some old guns which the Federals had damaged by spiking and cutting to the trunnions. They