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May 1667, m. Saml. Hides, d. 1741; Sarah, . 1 Jan. 1669-70, d. 11 Jan. 1669-70. Such are the dates in the record; but some of them are manifestly wrong. Richard the f. was killed by a fall from his scaffold, 2 Ap. 1690; his w. Ann d. prob. 15 July 1711. 2. Jacob, s. of Richard (1), by w. Patience, had Jacob, b. 12 Nov. 1679; Hannah, b. 25 Nov. 1685, m. Jonathan Hides, Jr., of Newton 4 April 1706; Experience, b. 1 Nov. 1687; Samuel, b. 7 Sept. 1694; Abigail, bap. 7 Feb. 1696-7, m. Samuel Griffin 9 Jan. 1716-17; Jacob, b. 13 Aug. 1699. Jacob the f. d. 24 Dec. 1698; his w. Patience prob. d. in 1711, when administration on her estate was granted. 3. Joseph, s. of Richard (1), was living in 1690, when he received a share of his father's estate. He was probably the same who d. at Concord, 1699 or 1700, leaving wife Mary. 4. Benjamin, S. of Richard (1), m. Mary Buckmaster, or Buckminster, 24 May 1688, and had Benjamin, b. 28 Ap. 1689; Isaac, bap. 10 Oct. 1697; Joseph, b. 21 F
May 1667, m. Saml. Hides, d. 1741; Sarah, . 1 Jan. 1669-70, d. 11 Jan. 1669-70. Such are the dates in the record; but some of them are manifestly wrong. Richard the f. was killed by a fall from his scaffold, 2 Ap. 1690; his w. Ann d. prob. 15 July 1711. 2. Jacob, s. of Richard (1), by w. Patience, had Jacob, b. 12 Nov. 1679; Hannah, b. 25 Nov. 1685, m. Jonathan Hides, Jr., of Newton 4 April 1706; Experience, b. 1 Nov. 1687; Samuel, b. 7 Sept. 1694; Abigail, bap. 7 Feb. 1696-7, m. Samuel Griffin 9 Jan. 1716-17; Jacob, b. 13 Aug. 1699. Jacob the f. d. 24 Dec. 1698; his w. Patience prob. d. in 1711, when administration on her estate was granted. 3. Joseph, s. of Richard (1), was living in 1690, when he received a share of his father's estate. He was probably the same who d. at Concord, 1699 or 1700, leaving wife Mary. 4. Benjamin, S. of Richard (1), m. Mary Buckmaster, or Buckminster, 24 May 1688, and had Benjamin, b. 28 Ap. 1689; Isaac, bap. 10 Oct. 1697; Joseph, b. 21 F
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
y our own battery. The guns were firing over the heads of his company, and a piece of wood from the shrapnel struck him on the scalp, killing him instantly. Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan, of the First Virginia, and Colonel Thomas H. Owen, of the Third, and Major Graves, of the Second, behaved with fine spirit. These four regiments and the battery worked together always with great harmony and good feeling. Captain Peter Fountain, Captain Henry C. Lee, brigade staff officers, and Sergeant-Major Samuel Griffin (Tip), of the Second Virginia, Acting A. D. C., served with their usual good spirit, rendering me valuable assistance. I know we killed a good number and captured some prisoners. From our own loss, it is manifest that theirs was considerable. Arriving at the Opequon after dark I reported to General Wickham orally what had been done, and moved back to camp. The next day Sheridan fell back and fortified near Halltown. Nine hundred and fifty men and a battery had driven their
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
cond Major, A. L. Pitzer. Third Major, Cary Breckinridge. Fourth Major, W. F. Graves. Fifth Major, Thomas Whitehead. First Adjutant, R. H. Banks. Second Adjutant, Lomax Tayloe. Third Adjutant, John W. Tayloe. Fourth Adjutant, Samuel Griffin. First Assistant Surgeon, S. H. Meredith. Second Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Bowyer. Third Assistant Surgeon, W. B. Davies. Fourth Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Nelson. Fifth Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Peake. Sixth Assistant Surgt Quartermaster, W. H. Trent. First Commissary, Albert McDaniel. First Sergeant-Major, William Steptoe. Second Sergeant-Major, John Fulks. Third Sergeant-Major, R. T. Watts. Fourth Sergeant-Major, W. J. Holcombe. Fifth Sergeant-Major, Samuel Griffin. First Color-Sergeant, Lomax Tayloe. Second Color-Sergeant, H. D. Yancey. Third Color-Sergeant, James E. Tucker. Fourth Color-Sergeant, J. T. Morgan. First Commissary-Sergeant, C. H. Almond. First Quartermaster-Serge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarks of Captain John Lamb on March 24, 1899, at Richmond, Virginia, in the Hall of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. In accepting, on behalf of the Camp, the portrait of General Thomas T. Munford, C. S. Cavalry. (search)
Munford, Confederate States Cavalry, a striking life-likeness, executed by Bernard Gutman, of Lynchburg, Virginia, was presented on Friday evening, March 24, 1899, to Robert E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, in a chaste address by Major Samuel Griffin of Bedford City, Virginia, who served as Adjutant-General on the staff of General Munford. It was evidently, as stated by the speaker, a labor of love, and was in glowing eulogy of the personal virtues and valor of the distinguished cavalt to condense in a brief compass that which would require more than an hour to rehearse, in order that justice might be done to the deserts of my old friend and comrade whose portrait I gratefully accept. Our thanks are due the comrade, Major Samuel Griffin, the Adjutant-General of our old brigade, for his eloquent and tasty address in presenting this portrait. He has relieved, in great measure, the burden which would have rested upon me, for he has told far better than I might of the distin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
ia, under Colonel Arthur Cummings, constituted the left flank of the brigade. When the critical juncture came, Jackson galloped to the right of the Fourth Virginia, called for Colonel Preston, told him in a few sharp words to order the men behind, up, and to charge and drive them to Washington! Attention! Forward march! Left oblique march! were the commands quickly given; left oblique, an order to press the left flank of our artillery, which was between our infantry and Pickett's and Griffin's guns, which were to be charged. Mr. J. B. Caddall, of Pulaski, was then in the 4th Virginia, and he gives an account, afterwards endorsed, with some interesting incidents of this regiment. It is a notable fact that Jackson's brigade line furnished the first immovable obstacle to McDowell's advance, for while all the troops acted gallantly that day those previously engaged had been unable to withstand the weight of numbers thrown against them. The first stand of Jackson and his tim
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
rces which seemed quite eager for constant combat. The Fifth Army Corps had been detailed to work with Sheridan's cavalry division. The subsequent relief of General Warren is a matter of history, which there is no need of repeating. General Griffin succeeded to command, and aided by the 6th, the 2d, and portions of the Army of the James, with other corps as fast as they could get to the scene, the military movements of that time form some of the most absorbing chapters of the Civil warand found assembled in the tent two of the three senior officers whom General Grant had selected to superintend the paroles and to look after the transfer of property and to attend to the final details of General Lee's surrender. These were General Griffin of the 5th Army Corps and General Gibbon of the 24th. The other commissioner, General Merritt of the cavalry, was not there. The articles of capitulation had been signed previously and it had come to the mere matter of formally settling th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
33. Fredericksburg, Artillery, The, 240; Battle of, 240; December 10, 1862, 269. Frederick City, Md., Victory at, 255. Gaines' Mill, From, to Westover, 3. Gettysburg Campaign, 8, 31, 113, 183. Gibson, Colonel J. Catlett, 200. Girardey, General J. V., 322. Gladden, General A. H., 132. Gladstone on Cruelty of the Bourbons at Naples, 344. Glenney, D. W., Desertion of, 58. Gordon's Reminiscences, General J. B., 69, 178, 200, 212, 227. Gregg, Fort, Fall of, 337. Griffin, Major Samuel, 1. Griffith-Barksdale-Humphrey Brigade, 250; gallantry of, 261. Haas, I. C., 98. Halleck, General H. W., 123. Hammond, Captain, killed, 8. Hampton, General Wade, 42; portrait of presented to Lee Camp, C. V., 134; descent, ability, nobility of character, and patriotisms, 137; tribute of General Lee to, 140, 164. Hanover Junction, Engagement at, 136. Harper, Colonel Kenton, 174. Harper's Ferry, Capture of, 257. Harris, Adjutant H. V., 191. Harris,
the autumn of 1785. Their first child, David (the subject of this notice), was born at East Sudbury, 12 Sept. 1787, and married Rebecca Derby, of Lynnfield, 16 Oct. 1815. Their children, born at Lunenburg, were Norwood, b. 7 Oct. 1816, Samuel Griffin, b. 10 Dec. 1821, Hannah Mottey, b. 5 March, 1823. Henry, b. 6 Nov. 1824, Delia Augusta, b. 19 July, 1826, Franklin, b. 11 Oct. 1827; Sarah Norwood, born at Amesbury, 10 Aug. 1829. Mrs. Rebecca Damon (widow of David Damon), died at Boston, 21 May, 1852. She was b. at Lynnfield, 9 Aug. 1787. Norwood (Damon) never married; resides in Boston. Samuel Griffin (Damon) married at Monson, Mass., Julia Fuller, of Monson, 23 Jan. 1849; she died at Monson, 1 April, 1850, without issue. He married for his second wife, Ella Gertrude Whitman, at Boston, 24 July, 1867. They reside at Arlington, on the spot where his father lived, and have had five children, all born in Arlington-Agnes Whitman, b. 20 Dec. 1869; David, b. 26 July, 1871,
65, 78 Gore, 13 Gorton, 7 Goss, 253 Gould, 63, 66, 63, 64, 77, 81, 141, 167, 226, 263, 291, 296, 349 Gourley, 342 Gowen, 253, 269 Gracie, 263, 322 Grafton, 176 Grant, 133, 166,194, 201, 263, 281, 336, 344 Graves, 167, 349, 351 Gray, 118, 154, 209, 212, 263 Greeley, 342 Green and Greene, 37, 100, 106, 108, 160,170, 172, 175, 176, 263,264, 280, 312, 322, 343 Greenlaw, 349 Greenleaf, 24, 264, 277 Greenough, 254 Greenwood, 68, 83, 264, 277 Griffin, 228 Griffiths, 18, 154, 289 Griggs, 264 Grimes, 68 Griswold, 140 Grover, 343 Guild, 346 Hackelton, 200, 254 Hadley, 194, 243, 254, 255, 343 Hagan, 341 Hagar, 141 Hale, 14, 206 Hall, 19, 20, 27, 28, 34, 37, 53, 66, 78, 83, 91, 92, 96, 106, 111, 112, 114, 116, 119,121, 124, 131, 132, 167-69, 174, 184, 198, 206, 207, 211, 214, 216, 223, 225, 237, 249, 254, 255, 258, 261, 286, 292, 297, 308, 344 Halle, 13 Hamblet, 2, 201, 256 Hamilton, 231, 244, 266