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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
Col. Charles W. Roberts; 18th Mass. (detached with Stoneman's command), Col. James Barnes; 22d Mass., Col. Jesse A. Gove (k), Maj. William S. Tilton (w and c), Capt. Walter S. Sampson, Capt. D. K. Wardwell; 1st Mich., Col. Horace S. Roberts; 13th N. Y., Col. Elisha G. Marshall, Maj. Francis A. Schoeffel; 25th N. Y., Maj. Edwin S. Gilbert (c), Captain Shepard Gleason; 2d Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Lieut. Charles D. Stiles. Brigade loss: k, 114; w, 443; mi, 329==886. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles Griffin: 9th Mass., Col. Thomas Cass (im w), Lieut.-Col. Patrick R. Guiney; 4th Mich., Col. Dwight A. Woodbury (k), Lieut.-Col. Jonathan W. Childs (w), Capt. John M. Randolph; 14th N. Y., Col. James McQuade; 62d Pa., Col. Samuel W. Black (k), Lieut.-Col. Jacob B. Sweitzer (w and c), Capt. James C. Hull. Brigade loss: k, 182; w, 772; in, 199 == 1153. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Daniel Butterfield: 12th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Robert M. Richardson; 17th N. Y. (detached with Stoneman's command), Co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
seven men and many horses. On the Union side, Martindale, Griffin, and Meade came up after the battle had begun, reinforcingim, taking position behind Seymour; Martindale and General Charles Griffin, of Morell's division, went, respectively, to the nts were relieved by the 4th Michigan and 14th New York of Griffin's brigade. On the extreme right a small force of the eneme hastened to join McCall, arriving opportunely in rear of Griffin's left. General Cooke was instructed to take position, onel Thomas Cass's gallant 9th Massachusetts Volunteers of Griffin's brigade obstinately resisted A. P. Hill's crossing, and y as possible into the woods, in support of Martindale and Griffin, whose brigades for a long time bore the brunt of the attaewton's brigade, being in advance, was led to the right of Griffin, there to drive back the enemy and retake ground only heldganizations were preserved. Near the close of the war General Griffin said to Colonel Auchmuty that he regarded Gaines's Mil
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The charge of Cooke's cavalry at Gaines's Mill. (search)
retreat. Captain W. C. Weeden, commanding Battery C, 1st Rhode Island Artillery, reports, Vol. XI., Pt. II., p. 282, Official Records, the loss of a section by stress of the enemy's attacks; the two other sections held in support in rear of Griffin's brigade opened fire; The smoke had filled the whole field to the woods, and it was impossible to direct the fire. The batteries were limbering to the rear in good order when, he says, the cavalry fugitives ran through them, but he only lost one more piece mired in the woods. But General Griffin reports that the artillery opened fire upon the enemy advancing upon our left; but it was too late; our infantry had already begun to fall back, and nothing being left to give confidence to the artillerymen, it was impossible to make then stand to their work. And that was just when the cavalry did go in and give confidence to the three batteries on the left, and the saving work was done. I have examined the Official Records and found re
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
ower picture, leads to the Quaker road and was the line of Griffin's guns. McQuade's repulse of the attack on the hill took nd Butterfield, while in front of these, facing north, was Griffin's brigade. All were supporting batteries of Morell's diviaptain Weeden and others, under the general supervision of Griffin, a brave and skilled artillery officer. These batteriesre the advance of a part of Butterfield's brigade, between Griffin and Couch, and the transfer of batteries from Morell to Coing reposted in commanding positions, and placed under General Griffin's command, but under Captain Weeden's care, just behinht made a determined attack by way of the meadow to pierce Griffin's line to turn Ames's Battery and to break the solid advanrates effected a lodgment on the hill, at dusk, compelling Griffin to shift his guns to avoid capture. General A. R. Wrightors. Colonel McQuade was the only regimental commander of Griffin's brigade who escaped death during the Seven Days, and he
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
reenforced by Piatt's brigade of Sturgis's division, and was estimated to be about twelve thousand strong; but in some hitherto unexplained manner one brigade Griffin's brigade. Griffin testified that he was ordered by General Morell to follow Sykes, who was supposed to have gone to Centreville. Griffin moved thence toward thGriffin testified that he was ordered by General Morell to follow Sykes, who was supposed to have gone to Centreville. Griffin moved thence toward the battle-field about 5 P. M. He found the road blocked, and the bridge over Cub Run broken.--Editors. of his (Porter's) corps had straggled off from the corps and appeared at Centreville during the day. With this straggling brigade was General Morell, commander of the division to which it belonged. This brigade remained at CentrGriffin moved thence toward the battle-field about 5 P. M. He found the road blocked, and the bridge over Cub Run broken.--Editors. of his (Porter's) corps had straggled off from the corps and appeared at Centreville during the day. With this straggling brigade was General Morell, commander of the division to which it belonged. This brigade remained at Centreville all day, in sight and sound of the battle in which the corps to which it belonged was engaged, but made no move to join it or to approach the field of battle. On the contrary, the brigade commander made requisition for ten thousand pairs of shoes on one of my aides-de-camp who was at Centreville in charge of the headquarter
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
= 18. Fifth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Fitz-John Porter. first division, Maj.-Gen. George W. Morell. First Brigade, Col. Charles W. Roberts: 2d Me., Maj. Daniel F. Sargent; 18th Mass., Capt. Stephen Thomas, Maj. Joseph Hayes; 22d Mass. (not in action), Capt. Mason W. Burt; 13th N. Y., Col. Elisha G. Marshall; 25th N. Y., Col. Charles A. Johnson; 1st Mich., Col. Horace S. Roberts (k), Capt. Emery W. Belton. Brigade loss: k, 103; w, 374; in, 99 = 576. Second Brigade (not in action), Brig.-Gen. Charles Griffin: 9th Mass., Col. Patrick R. Guiney; 32d Mass., Col. Francis J. Parker; 14th N. Y., Col. James McQuade; 62d Pa., Col. Jacob B. Sweitzer; 4th Mich., Col. Jonathan W. Childs. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Daniel Butterfield (commanded First and Third Brigades in battle of August 30th), Col. Henry S. Lansing, Col. Henry A. Weeks (w), Col. James C. Rice: 12th N. Y., Col. Henry A. Weeks, Capt. Augustus I. Root (w), Capt. William Hiuson, Capt. Ira Wood; 17th N. Y., Col. Henry S. Lansing, Maj.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
eorge J. Summat. first division, Maj.-Gen. George W. Morell. First Brigade, Col. James Barnes: 2d Me., Col. Charles W. Roberts; 18th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph Hayes; 22d Mass., Lieut.-Col. William, S. Tilton; 1st Mich., Capt. Emory W. Belton; 13th N. Y., Col. Elisha G. Marshall; 25th N. Y., Col. Charles A. Johnson; 118th Pa., Col. Charles M. Prevost; 2d Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Capt. Lewis E. Wentworth. Brigade loss: Shepherdstown, k, 66; w, 125; m, 130 == 321. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles Griffin: 2d D. C., Col. Charles M. Alexander; 9th Mass., Col. Patrick R. Guiney; 32d Mass., Col. Francis J. Parker; 4th Mich., Col. Jonathan W. Childs; 14th N. Y., Col. James McQuade; 62d Pa., Col. Jacob B. Sweitzer. Brigade loss: Shepherdstown, k, 1; w, 10 == 11. Third Brigade, Col. T. B. W. Stockton: 20th Me., Col. Adelbert Ames; 16th Mich., Lieut.-Col. Norval E. Welch; 12th N. Y., Capt. William Huson; 17th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Nelson B. Bartram; 44th N. Y., Maj. Freeman Conner; 83d Pa.,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
I asked General Sykes why our reserves did not advance upon receiving Dryer's report. He answered that he remembered the circumstance very well and that he thought McClellan was inclined to order in the Fifth Corps, but that when he spoke of doing so Fitz John Porter said: Remember, General! I command the last reserve of the last Army of the Republic. McClellan answered this by saying that he did not think it prudent to divest the center of all reserve troops. At this time Sykes and Griffin, of Porter's corps, had been advanced, and part of their troops were actively engaged.--Editors. No doubt a single strong division marching beyond the left flank of the Ninth Corps would have so occupied A. P. Hill's division that our movement into Sharpsburg could not have been checked, and, assisted by the advance of Sumner and Franklin on the right, apparently would have made certain the complete rout of Lee. As troops are put in reserve, not to diminish the army, but to be used in a pin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
ord, Prom the Maryland side. From a recent photograph. This picture, taken from the tow-path of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, shows the ford bellow Shepherdstown by which Lee's army retreated after Antietam, the cliff on the Virginia side being the scene of the disaster to the 118th Pennsylvania, or Corn Exchange, regiment. When Porter's corps arrived at the Potomac in pursuit, on September 19th, Confederate artillery on the cliffs disputed the passage. A small Union force, under General Griffin, moved across the river in face of a warm fire, and, scaling the heights, captured several pieces of artillery. This attacking party was recalled during the night. Next morning, the 20th, two brigades of Sykes's division crossed and gained the heights on the left by the cement mill, while one brigade of Morell's division advanced to the right toward Shepherdstown and ascended the heights by way of the ravine. The 118th Pennsylvania formed beyond the crest and abreast of the dam. Soon
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
tain representations unfavorable to Generals Porter, Franklin, and Griffin. On the 5th, by the same order that relieved General Pope from command, the President directed that Generals Porter, Franklin, and Griffin be relieved from their respective commands until the charges againss preferred by General Pope against Generals Franklin, Porter, and Griffin. The detail consisted of Major-General George Cadwalader, Brigadihe field on the day last named, and Generals Franklin, Porter, and Griffin being already there. On the 17th of November a military commissg laid before the Government the conduct of McClellan, Porter, and Griffin, and of being not disposed to push the matter farther unless the sly, October 10th, Halleck says: Again you complain that Porter and Griffin have not been tried on your charges against them. You know that any attempt to engage the enemy; but not guilty of having permitted Griffin's and Piatt's brigades to leave the battle-field and go to Centrev