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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 3 1 Browse Search
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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1857. I have lately been much interested about the young Kentucky lady Miss Mattie Griffith. who emancipated all her slaves, in consequence of reading Charles Sumner's speeches. She and I correspond, as mother and daughter, and I should infer from her letters, even if I knew nothing else about her, that she was endowed with a noble, generous, sincere, and enthusiastic nature. It is no slight sacrifice, at nineteen years old, to give up all one's property, and go forth into the world to earn her own living, penniless and friendless; but I shall earn my living with a light heart, because I shall have a clean conscience. I quote her own words, which she wrote in an hour of sadness, in consequence of being cut by friends, reproached by relations, and deluged with insulting letters from every part of the South. Her relatives resort to both coaxing and threatening, to induce her publicly to deny that she wrote the Autobiography of a female slave.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Reply of Mrs. Child. (search)
that we think nothing of it. Lest any one should think that the slaves are generally well treated, and that the cases I mentioned are exceptions, let me be distinctly understood that cruelty is the rule, and kindness is the exception. In the same discussion, a student from Virginia, after relating cases of great cruelty, said: Such things are common all over Virginia; at least, so far as I am acquainted. But the planters generally avoid punishing their slaves before strangers. Miss Mattie Griffith of Kentucky, whose entire property consisted in slaves, emancipated them all. The noble-hearted girl wrote to me: I shall go forth into the world penniless; but I shall work with a light heart, and, best of all, I shall live with an easy conscience. Previous to this generous resolution, she had never read any abolition document, and entertained the common Southern prejudice against them. But her own observation so deeply impressed her with the enormities of slavery, that she was im
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
campaign and Kansas conflict, 79, 80: working for the Kansas emigrants, 83; writes a Free Soil song, 83; death of her father, 87; interviews with Charles Sumner and Henry Wilson, 88; her low estimate of worldly rank, 89 ; corresponds with Miss Mattie Griffith, 89: meets David A. Wasson, 91; her grief at Ellis Gray Loring's death, 95; meets J. G. Whittier, 97; her indebtedness to her brother, 98; her delight in works of art and in nature, 98, 99; reads Buckle's History of civilization, 99; linesse of, gutted by rioters, 178. Giles, Governor, message of, to Virginia Legislature, 132. Girl's book. The, VII. Goethe and Bettine, 50, 51, Grant's (President U. S.) election, 199; reelection, 213; his Indian policy, 220. Griffith, Miss, Mattie, emancipates her slaves, 89-91; her Autobiography of a female slave, 90, 132. Grimke, Angelina, addresses a committee of the 1;Massachusetts Legislature, 26; her testimony against slavery, 130. Grimke, Sarah M., her testimony agains
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
ited the home and grave of Andrew Jackson. From Mammoth Cave he wrote, June 18, to Albert G. Browne, Jr., 1835-1891. Browne was a youth of fine promise. which was fulfilled by performance. He was private secretary of Governor Andrew during the Civil War, and aided greatly in the despatch of public business at that period. He became reporter of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts, an was afterwards of the editorial corps of the New York Evening Post and New York Herald. He married Mattie Griffith of Kentucky,—a noble woman, who had emancipated her inherited slaves. a youth studying in Berlin, son of an old friend:— My dear Albert,—Here I am now in this distant solitude, weary with a tramp of twenty-five miles beneath the ground; and I dedicate an early moment to you. I have been glad to hear of your studies and happiness. I doubt not you are laying up a goodly store for future use. Of course you will master the German, and I hope before you return you will do the same <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
powers, great themes, and a magnificent opportunity are rarely combined in the experience of one man; but still more rarely does that eminent and Christian spirit unite with them which enables a man to consecrate the powers, ennoble the theme, and improve the opportunity. The North now testifies through millions of throbbing hearts how it welcomes you as one of the illustrious few; and the South has testified through the mode of expression most natural to it its equal recognition. Miss Mattie Griffith, of Kentucky, Later, Mrs. Albert G. Browne. Jr. the owner of inherited slaves, afterwards liberated, wrote from Philadelphia, June 8: Afar off in Kentucky I learned to love your name and reverence your heroism. I used to hide away in the woods, or in still corners of the house, to read your speeches, every word of which was heavenly manna to my hungry soul! There was a life, a strain of soul and power in them that always moved me in the very source of thought and tears; and I bl