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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 56 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for James W. Grimes or search for James W. Grimes in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
ce, until nothing more was left to tell. while he was stating the history of events, Senator James W. Grimes (the eminent statesman, and friend of the Navy), entered the Secretary's room, and listamber, the Secretary of the Navy being left to overhaul the despatches. on the arrival of Senator Grimes with Captain Bailey, on the floor of the Senate, the latter was received by Senators with thnguage. Secretary Welles, on reading Farragut's report, lost no time in writing a note to Senator Grimes, and sending it off with all dispatch. It read, Don't take any steps resulting from Captain his report of the affair and that of Flag-officer Farragut, which must be inquired into. Senator Grimes had just taken the floor, and was eulogizing the brilliant victory that had been reported, wld have hoped for — and he likely would have been made the next Rear-Admiral on the list. Senator Grimes, in the kindness of his heart, went to him and showed him Mr. Welles' letter, and told him t