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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 12 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Angelina Grimke or search for Angelina Grimke in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
ti-slavery pamphlet, in the record of his appearance before the [Mass.] Senate to protest against the attempt to punish meetings like these with the State Prison (Lib. 28.91). to W. L. Garrison, at Brooklyn. Boston, Dec. 5, 1835. I write you in behalf of Miss Susan Cabot, a sister of our friend Mrs. Follen, and a firm supporter of the abolition faith. Eliza Lee Follen. She is about to pass some weeks in Philadelphia, and has a strong desire to become acquainted with Miss Grimke, who A. Grimke. wrote the admired letter in the Liberator addressed to you. . . . Ante, 1.518. I have just read with intense interest Dr. Channing's tract on Slavery. It is the most elaborate work on the philosophy of Anti-Slavery I have ever seen, and appears most seasonably when iniquity is claiming to pass for an angel of light. I am grieved at some few censures of the abolitionists in it, put forth, I think, on insufficient grounds, but nineteen-twentieths of the book are sound in principle,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
in great peril. Still, his situation could not be fully realized by those who did not know the elements of the community in which he was endeavoring to maintain himself; and, his case excepted, there seemed a lull in violence over the whole field when Mr. Garrison wrote thus, on November 6, to Miss Elizabeth Pease, The daughter of a wealthy and philanthropic Quaker, Joseph Pease; a lady whom he had never met, and who had just introduced herself by a gift of five guineas sent through Angelina Grimke. An intimate and lifelong friendship ensued. of Darlington, England: With regard to the present state of the anti-slavery Ms. question in this country, you will be pleased to learn that the friends of the slave are daily multiplying in all parts of the non-slaveholding States; that there are now not less than twelve hundred anti-slavery societies in existence; that the spirit of lawless violence is in a great measure subdued, not by the arm of law, but by the power of truth and
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ight. In our State politics, the Temperance question is so fairly on the ground that we have not room to stand. It won't do for us to start the national politics. But if the Parent Society does so, and not by our move—then we can take hold with all our might, the non-resistants will have to be out upon us under true flag—the confounded woman question The New York Board was so thoroughly imbued with Calvinistic prejudices that it came very near throwing me overboard for encouraging Angelina Grimke to speak as well as write. It was the controversy on that point that led me to transfer all the reverence or respect I ever had for Paul to Hypatia, who sacrificed a far nobler life for humanity some centuries later—murdered by the very monkery which grew out of Paul's doctrine about woman (Ms. April 15, 1881, Elizur Wright to Oliver Johnson). will be forgotten—and we shall take a living position. You certainly see this. Take my solemn assurance that it is Life and death with us. M
ass., Mar. 4, 1803; d. there June 21, 1871], at Peace Convention, 2.228; on Lib. finance com., 256, 331, 332; correspondent of E. Pease, 412; cut off from Friends' Society, 413; calls Chardon St. Convention, 422. Beacon (Norfolk), 1.467. Beckwith, Geo. C. [d. 1870, aged 70], opposes radical peace views, 2.226; on business com. of Peace Convention, 227, withdraws, 228, repudiates Non-Resistance Soc., 242. Beecher, Catherine Esther [1800-1874], essay on slavery, 2.133, 134, reply by A. Grimke, 1.398, 2.134. Daughter of Beecher, Lyman, Rev. [1775-1863], church attended by G., 1.78; private A. S. appeal from G., 214; attends G.'s lecture, 212; declines to support him, 215; consecrates Polish standards, 250; restitution to blacks by colonizing, 261; sabbatarianism, 267; suppresses A. S. discussion at Lane Seminary, 454, 2.108; Thanksgiving sermon, 106, and Sabbath discourse, 106-114, 122, comment by Noyes, 147, 152.—Portrait in Memorial Hist. Boston, vol. 3. Beilby, Dr. (of E