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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
e Congress, so-called, 566. Jefferson Davis and his chosen Counselors, 567. Confederate pirate ships, 568. the pirates Semmes and Maffit, 569. Confederate naval commission, 570. Barbarism and Civilization illustrated by the Alabama and George Griswold. 571. Vicksburg and its importance, 572. Grant's advance in Mississippi, 573. serious disaster at Holly Springs, 574. Sherman's descent of the Mississippi, 575. natural defenses of Vicksburg, 576. movements at Chickasaw Bayou in their common humanity, and the citizens of New York. alone, whose merchants suffered most by the piracies, contributed more than one hundred thousand dollars for the relief of starving English families. They loaded the ship George Griswold The George Griswold this was the appearance of the ship while she was a-loading at her wharf on the East River. High up on her rigging was a piece of canvas, on which were the words, contributions for Lancashire. Freight Free. with food, and sent her ou
1.467; compelled to surrender by Lyons, 1.468. Fugitive Slave Law, remarks on the, 1.67. G. Gaines's Farm, battle of, 3.422. Gala day in Charleston, i, 98. Galveston, surrender of to Commander Renshaw, 2.538; capture of by Magruder, 1.594: blockade of reestablished by Farragut, 2.594. Gardner, Gen. Frank K., his defense of Port Hudson against Gen. Banks, 2.631. Gauley Mountain, Rosecrans at the summit of, 2.94. Geary, Gen., at the battle of Wauhatchie, 3.153. George Griswold, ship, sent to England with food for operatives, 2.571. Georgia, secession movements in, 1.51; divided sentiment of the legislature of, 1.52; action of the legislature, 1.58; secession agitation in, 1.176; convention in, 1.178; Sherman's campaign in against Johnston and Hood, 3.374-3.399; Sherman's march through to Savannah, 3.405-3.414; visit of the author to, 3.399. Georgia, Confederate cruiser, seized (note), 3.435. Gettysburg, Lee's forces at, 3.57; great battles at, 3.59-3
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), George Griswold, the (search)
George Griswold, the A ship sent from the United States in 1862 with food for starving English operatives. The blockade of Southern ports had caused a lack of the cotton supply in England and the running of mills on half-time or shutting them up altogether. This produced wide-spread distress in the manufacturing districts. In Lancashire alone 1,000,000 depended for bread on the mills. In 1862 a pitiful cry of distress came over the sea. It was heard by the loyal people of the North, who, repressing their just resentment against the British government for the aid and comfort it had given to the enemies of the republic, heeded the cry, and the George Griswold was laden at New York, chiefly through the liberality of merchants there, with food for the starving English operatives of the value of more than $200,000. With her was sent a government war-vessel as a convoy to protect her precious freight from any possible attack of the Anglo-Confederate cruiser Alabama (q. v.), which
es T. Brady, Daniel Lord, Sheppard Knapp, Wm. A. Booth, Wm. Whitlock, Jr., N. Ludlam, J. J. Rooeevelt, Isaac Seymour, J. McLeod Murphy, A. R. Wetmore, G. S. Bedford, Wm. M. Richards, W. C. Rhinelander, Thomas Tileston, Jno. A. Kennedy, O. A. Brownson, Jno.F. Butterworth, F. S. Winston, Jno. C. Hamilton, Denning Duer, J. A. Westervelt, Wm. H. Stewart, C. R. Robert, George S. Robbins, Richard Patrick, Robert T. Haws, John S. Giles, John H. Hall, George Griswold, Ezra Nye, George Law, Fred. Foster, H. B. Raymond, L. B. Woodruff, Solomon Banta, Morgan Jones, George Young, D. P. Maurice, Horace Greeley, Dan. E. Devlin, Wm. G. Lambert, A. W. Bradford. W. S. Hatch, W. P. Lee, Erastus C. B.nedict, C. Newbold, W. H. Appleton, Jno. E. Williams, Richard Irvin, William Tucker, Val. G. Hall, James Marsh, Horace Webster, D. A. Cushman, A. C. Richards, Tim'y P. Chapman, Chas. P. Kirkland, Jno. Dimon,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
which reached me at the house of a friend, near Manchester, on the 24th. A portion of that letter was read at the great meeting held in the Free Trade Hall, on the evening of the same day, to present an address of welcome to the captain of the Griswold. The George Griswold, a vessel sent from New York to Liverpool laden with food for the suffering Lancashire operatives—the contribution of New York merchants. I was at the same hour attending another immense gathering in the town of HuddersfiGeorge Griswold, a vessel sent from New York to Liverpool laden with food for the suffering Lancashire operatives—the contribution of New York merchants. I was at the same hour attending another immense gathering in the town of Huddersfield. I read parts of the same letter at a meeting last evening in London, at which an Address was presented to me by Feb. 25. some kind and partial friends. The papers I send with this Lib. 33.46, 160. will give you some account of these proceedings. It would be impossible to give you a list of all the meetings which have recently been held, for the purpose of expressing sympathy with the anti-slavery movement in the United States, and commendation of the abolition policy of the Governme
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
e supply thus obtained, he was able to make for the open sea at once. During the last three months of the year 1862 he destroyed no less than twenty-eight large merchant vessels. After setting them on fire he preserved their chronometers as trophies, and returned to land their crews either at the Bermudas or at Nassau, where he was always sure to find aid and protection. He thus spread terror among all American ship-owners; and when the New York merchants sent the large three-masted George Griswold to England, loaded with donations for the Lancashire workmen who were suffering from the cotton famine, a ship of war had to escort this vessel on her charitable errand, to protect her against the Liverpool pirate. The marine insurance soon rose so high that the Americans were obliged to denationalize their merchant vessels, and the carrying trade was almost entirely effected under the British flag. The English, therefore, profited by the damage done to the United States by a vessel f