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William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge. You can also browse the collection for R. W. Griswold or search for R. W. Griswold in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
so had Scott. They were all meannesses, and I confess I can sooner pardon crimes, if they are manly ones. I have never had any quarrel with Mr. Irving, and give him full credit as a writer. Still I believe him to be below the ordinary level, in moral qualities, instead of being above them, as he is cried up to be. He adds: Bryant is worth forty Irvings in every point of view, but he runs a little into the seemly (?) school. Letters of R. W. Griswold, pp. 144, 145. Whipple writes to Griswold six years later: I have no patience with the New York literati. They are all the time quarrelling with each other. Why not kiss and be friends? Ibid., p. 233. No such letter could ever have been written about the three most eminent Cambridge authors, nor could anything be more simple, delightful, and free from clouds than the whole intercourse between Holmes, Lowell, and Longfellow. To those outside their own circle, and especially to Margaret Fuller, this cordiality did not always ext
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
r, Charles Russell Lowell, occupied Elmwood. The great and even controlling influence exercised upon Lowell from this time by his betrothed, Maria White, who afterward became his wife, is well known, and the simplicity of their daily life is well portrayed in the following extracts from a sort of diary communicated by Lowell about the year 1849 to his friend, Charles F. Briggs, of New York, who then edited Holden's Magazine. By a letter from Briggs to R. W. Griswold Letters of R. W, Griswold, p. 257. it would appear that he was in charge of it in January, 1850, which must have been about the time of this letter. There is not, I think, in all Mr. Norton's delightful collection of Lowell's correspondence anything quite so thoroughly local, or giving so close a glimpse of Old Cambridge. The editor's preface is as follows:-- A Pepysian letter. Just as we had taken up our pen to go on with our topics, we received a letter from a Down East correspondent, so full of Pepysi