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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for C. W. Gross or search for C. W. Gross in all documents.

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ted on the palisades, and headed down the valley. At the same time Gross's brigade advanced resolutely, with brisk skirmishing, drove the enbridge to engage the attention of the enemy, and for the balance of Gross's brigade to follow Wood's. Meanwhile a section of howitzers was pls skirmishers smartly engaged, and all the guns opened. Wood's and Gross's then sprang across the river, joined Geary's left, and moved downack the rebels, while the residue of the column formed their lines; Gross's brigade, with the Fifty-first Ohio and Thirty-fifth Indiana, of Wto convey to the enemy the impression that we were still after him. Gross's brigade was despatched on this service. About two miles out he r The brigade returned at eight o'clock, and went into bivouac. Colonel Gross's report in this connection closes by saying that we found brok on the thirtieth, under instructions from department headquarters, Gross's brigade, Cruft's division, marched for the old battle-field at Ch
les and drew my command up in line on a ridge one mile west of the railroad, awaiting movements of the enemy. I remained in my position, where I was joined by Colonel Gross, commanding a brigade of First division, Fourth army corps. Soon after the arrival of Colonel Gross, I dismounted my command and advanced in line against the Colonel Gross, I dismounted my command and advanced in line against the enemy, driving their skirmishers about a mile in the direction of their camp. But there I was compelled to fall back, being attacked by a brigade of rebel infantry, who were firing at my men from behind log huts. I fell back to the line of Colonel Gross, and soon afterward (as it was nearly dark) retired about two miles to the reColonel Gross, and soon afterward (as it was nearly dark) retired about two miles to the rear, where I encamped for the night. The next morning, February twenty-fifth, I took a position on the left of our infantry lines, and advanced as they did. I moved up about half a mile, when my men became engaged with the enemy. I was then joined by one hundred men of the Fourth Michigan cavalry, who had been ordered to report
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. (search)
t Engineer Syms, who was wounded in the head while fighting a few guerrillas who had fired into a party of my men, while close to Alexandria. He has since arrived safe. The whole action lasted about five hours, and the Covington was badly riddled from stem to stern, there being no less than five shots in her hull, and some forty or fifty in her upper works. The officers and men behaved with great gallantry, and with the exception of a few this was their first action. Acting Master's Mate C. W. Gross was killed by a shot that came through the shellroom. The officers and men lost all of their personal effects; the only things that were saved being the signal-book and the despatches intrusted to my care, which were returned to you. The arms that were brought with us, I turned over to Acting Master H. Gorringe, of the Cricket, taking a receipt for the same. In conclusion, I most respectfully beg that a court of inquiry may be called to determine whether the honor of our flag suffer