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Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Grotius or search for Grotius in all documents.

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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
int Military Governors, was a War Power, and that was a Congressional Power; for among its prerogatives, the Constitution clearly enumerates to declare war, suppress insurrections, and support armies. It is Congress that conquers, and the same authority that conquers, must govern. Would you know, inquires Mr. Sumner, the extent of these powers that must be conceded to Congress? He gives the following answer: They will be found in the authoritative texts of Public Law,—in the works of Grotius, Vattel, and Wheaton. They are the powers conceded by civilized society to nations at war, known as the Rights of War, at once multitudinous and minute, vast and various. It would be strange, if Congress could organize armies and navies to conquer, and could not also organize governments to protect. De Tocqueville, who saw our institutions with so keen an eye, remarked, that, since, in spite of all political fictions, the preponderating power resided in the State governments, and not i
int Military Governors, was a War Power, and that was a Congressional Power; for among its prerogatives, the Constitution clearly enumerates to declare war, suppress insurrections, and support armies. It is Congress that conquers, and the same authority that conquers, must govern. Would you know, inquires Mr. Sumner, the extent of these powers that must be conceded to Congress? He gives the following answer: They will be found in the authoritative texts of Public Law,—in the works of Grotius, Vattel, and Wheaton. They are the powers conceded by civilized society to nations at war, known as the Rights of War, at once multitudinous and minute, vast and various. It would be strange, if Congress could organize armies and navies to conquer, and could not also organize governments to protect. De Tocqueville, who saw our institutions with so keen an eye, remarked, that, since, in spite of all political fictions, the preponderating power resided in the State governments, and not i