hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 39 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 36 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 29 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 28 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 24 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 18 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 276 results in 49 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
rce at Fisher's Hill without a possibility of my preventing it. Neither Wilson's cavalry nor Grover's infantry had yet joined me, and the necessities, already explained, which obliged me to hold wanking operations. This retrograde movement would also enable me to strengthen my command by Grover's division of the Nineteenth Corps and Wilson's cavalry, both of which divisions were marching two and a half miles west of Charlestown, on the Smithfield pike; and Emory, with Dwight's and Grover's divisions (Grover's having joined that morning from Washington), to a position about the same Grover's having joined that morning from Washington), to a position about the same distance south of Charlestown, on the Berryville pike. Following these movements, Merritt fell back to Berryville, covering the Berryville pike crossing of the Opequon, and Wilson was stationed at Such importance occurred. The line from Clifton of Berryville was occupied by the Sixth Corps and Grover's and Dwight's divisions of the Nineteenth, Crook being transferred to Summit Point, whence I co
enant John V. Grant. Second division: Brigadier-General Cuvier Grover. first brigade: Brigadier-General Henxth and Nineteenth corps through the narrow defile, Grover's division being greatly delayed there by a train oll's division in reserve in rear of the other two. Grover's division of the Nineteenth Corps came next on the Just before noon the line of Getty, Ricketts, and Grover moved forward, and as we advanced, the Confederatesressing back Ramseur's infantry and Lomax's cavalry Grover attacked from the right with decided effect. GroveGrover in a few minutes broke up Evans's brigade of Gordon's division, but his pursuit of Evans destroyed the contiback a part of Ricketts's division, and the most of Grover's. As these troops were retiring I ordered Russell'st as the flank of the enemy's troops in pursuit of Grover was presented, Upton's brigade, led in person by boht's division was then brought up on the right, and Grover's men formed behind it. The charge of Russell w
that everything was all right, that the enemy was quiet at Fisher's Hill, and that a brigade of Grover's division was to make a reconnoissance in the morning, the 19th, so about 10 o'clock I went to ork Light Artillery, Fifth Battery, Captain Elijah. D. Taft. Second division. (1) Brigadier-General Cuvier Grover. (2) Brigadier-General Henry W. Birge. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Henry that it was not a sustained fire, but rather irregular and fitful. I remarked: It's all right; Grover has gone out this morning to make a reconnoissance, and he is merely feeling the enemy. I triedttle, and as he again said that it did not, I still inferred that the cannonading was caused by Grover's division banging away at the enemy simply to find out what he was up to. However, I went down-ain how matters were getting on there. As I passed along behind the advancing troops, first General Grover, and then Colonel Mackenzie, rode up to welcome me. Both were severely wounded, and I told t<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
n pieces of artillery, and hold those works, it being my intention to force their left. This was about 11 A. M. Meantime, at 7:30 A. M., General Hooker, on his own responsibility, had advanced his lines. In his official report he says: Being in pursuit of a retreating army, I deemed it my duty to lose no time in making the disposition to attack, regardless of their number and position, except to accomplish the result with the least possible sacrifice of life. Hooker sent forward Grover's brigade, and Bramhall's and Webber's batteries, and very soon all opposition on his front was silenced for a time. Longstreet, however, ordered up reinforcements, and soon had a section of Pelham's battery, and the three fresh brigades of Wilcox, Pickett, and A. P. Hill on the ground, driving Hooker back, with the loss of all his cannon, and heavy casualties. During his desperate engagement, Hooker reported his situation to Sumner, and Kearny was promptly ordered up with his division, wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
liamsburg, Va. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Major-General George B. McClellan. Brigadier-General Edwin V. Sumner, second in command. Third Army Corps, Brigadier-General Samuel P. Heintzelman. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Joseph Hooker. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover: 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin; 11th Mass., Col. William Blaisdell; 2d N. H., Col. Gilman Marston; 26th Pa., Col. William F. Small (w), Major Casper M. Berry. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 186; m, 34 == 253. Second Brigade, Col. Nelson Taylor: 70th N. Y., Col. William Dwight, Jr. (w c), Major Thomas Holt: 72d N. Y.. Lieut.-Col. Israel Moses; 73d N. Y.. Col. William R. Brewster; 74th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Burtis. Brigade loss: k, 191; w, 349; m, 232 == 772. Third Brigade, Brig.-G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
of White Oak Bridge and Charles City Court House, to the James River and communicated with the gun-boat fleet. After the battle of Seven Pines, General Lee determined to defend Richmond on the line then held by his army. This fact, in connection with the success of General Jackson in freeing the Shenandoah Valley of Union forces, restored the confidence of the people at Richmond. A large draft of soldiers from the ranks furnished a laboring force to build intrenchments, and slaves in the counties around Richmond were impressed for the work. On the 18th of June, Brigadier-General Cuvier Grover's brigade, of Hooker's division, made a reconnoissance between the Williamsburg road and the railroad, and found the Confederates in force behind earth-works. The divisions of Hooker and Kearny advanced on the 25th to a point called Oak Grove, about four miles from Richmond, in front of Seven Pines. This was the nearest approach to Richmond during the investment by McClellan. Editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
, Col. Charles H. Tompkins: A, 1st R. I., Capt. John A. Tompkins; I, 1st U. S., Lieut. Edmund Kirby. Artillery loss: w, 12; m, 4==16. reserve artillery: G, 1st N. Y., Capt. John B. Frank; B, 1st R. I., Capt. Walter O. Bartlett; G, 1st R. I., Capt. Charles D. Owen. Reserve artillery loss: w, 6; m, 2==8. Third Corps, Brig.-Gen. S. P. Heintzelman. Cavalry: 3d Pa., Col. William W. Averell. Loss: k, 6; w, 2; mi, 3==11. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Joseph Hooker. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover: 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin; 11th Mass., Col. William Blaisdell; 16th Mass., Col. Powell T. Wyman (k), Lieut.-Col. George A. Meacham (w), Maj. Daniel S. Lamson; 2d N.--I., Col. Gilman Marston; 26th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George D. Wells. Brigade loss: k, 25; w, 214; m, 116==355. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Daniel E. Sickles: 70th N. Y., Maj. Thomas Holt; 71st N. Y., Col. George B. Hall; 72d N. Y., Col. Nelson Taylor; 73d N. Y., Capt. Alfred A. Donalds; 74th N. Y., Col. Charles K. Graha
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
kson's approach, but information of that event, that caused the withdrawal of the Union troops, who, with the exception of some batteries and infantry skirmishers, were withdrawn before sunrise on the 27th. Editors. Map of the battle of Frayser's farm (Charles City cross-roads or Glendale), June 30, 1862, showing Approximate positions of Union and Confederate troops. Also disposition of troops during the artillery engagement at White Oak Bridge. Union brigades: 1, Sickles; 2, Carr; 3, Grover; 4, Seymour; 5, Reynolds (Simmons); 6, Meade (this brigade should be represented as north of the road); 7, Robinson; 8, Birney; 9, Berry; 10, Newton; 11, Bartlett; 12,12, Taylor; 13, Burns; 11, 14, Dana; 15,15, Sully; 16, 16, Caldwell; 17, French; 18, Meagher; 19, Na glee (of Keyes's corps); 20, Davidson; 21, Brooks; 22, Hancock. Randol's battery was on the right of the road, Kerns's and Cooper's on the left, and Diederichs's and Knieriem's yet farther to the left. Thompson's battery of Ke
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
anying reports. General Jackson in his report, dated April 27th, 1863, says: Brevet Major-General Cuvier Grover. both on Friday and Saturday afternoons there was desperate fighting about the site, and to the right of the site of the battle monument (see map, p. 473). on Friday afternoon Grover's brigade, of Hooker's division, here charged Jackson's center before Kearny's successful and bloody charge on Jackson's left. Grover led 5 regiments, altogether about 1500 men, and in 20 minutes lost 486, or nearly one-third of his command. In his report, General Grover says: I rode over General Grover says: I rode over the field in front as far as the position of the enemy would admit. After rising the hill under which my command lay, an open field was entered, and from one edge of it gradually fell off in a slope parties were not to be disturbed in their mission of mercy. After the failure of the attempt of Grover and Kearny to carry the railroad embankment, the Confederates followed their troops back and for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
Capt. William Wakenshaw. Brigade loss: 1, 25; w, 115; in, 38 = 178. Artillery: E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; K, 1st U. S., Capt. William M. Graham. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 1 = 3. Second division, Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover, Col. Robert Cowdin: 2d N. H., Col. Gilman Marston ; 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin, Capt. Clark B. Baldwin; 11th Mass., Col. William Blaisdell; 16th Mass., Maj. Gardner Banks; 26th Pa., Maj. RobeBrig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover, Col. Robert Cowdin: 2d N. H., Col. Gilman Marston ; 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin, Capt. Clark B. Baldwin; 11th Mass., Col. William Blaisdell; 16th Mass., Maj. Gardner Banks; 26th Pa., Maj. Robert L. Bodine. Brigade loss: I, 55; w, 329; m, 103 = 487. Second Brigade, Col. Nelson Taylor: 70th N. Y., Capt. Charles L. Young; 71st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Henry L. Potter (w), Capt. Owen Murphy; 72d N. Y., Capt. Harman J. Bliss; 73d N. Y., Capt. Alfred A. Donalds (m w), Capt. M. William Burns; 74th N. Y., Maj. Edward L. Price. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 217; m, 65 = 329. Third Brigade, Col. Joseph B. Carr: 2d N. Y., Capt. Sidney W. Park; 5th N. J., Lieut.-Col. William J. Sewell; 6th N. J., Col. Gers
1 2 3 4 5