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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
864, when, on account of his experience as a builder, he was assigned to a corps of engineers engaged in repairing railroad bridges. While on this duty at Bristol, Tenn., he was again wounded. Since the war he has been successfully occupied as a carpenter and builder, residing mainly at Greenville. In 1874 he was married to Nancy Galbreath, who died in 1889. J. S. Guy J. S. Guy, of Lowreyville, a veteran of the Sixth regiment, was born in Chester county, in 1836. His father, William Guy, Sr., a prosperous farmer of the same county, was the son of Samuel Guy, a native of Pennsylvania who came to South Carolina in 1756, and served with honor in the war of the Revolution against the British, and in the snow campaign against the Cherokee Indians. His mother was Eliza Lindsay, daughter of James Lindsay, who came to the State from Ireland in a ship from Cork after peace followed the Revolution. Mr. Guy entered the service of the State early in 1861 as a private of the Calhoun G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nclude: Brothers, God grant, when this life is o'er, In the life to come we may meet once more. A reminiscence of the Christmas of 1861. By W. F. Shippey. It was Christmas day in the year 1861. A party of officers and soldiers of the old First Virginia Cavalry, then encamped near Bull Run, had assembled to celebrate the day at Stuart's Tavern, on the Little River Turnpike. The party was composed of Captain Jas. H. Drake, Captain Irving, Lieutenant Larrick, Dave and Gash Drake, Wm. Guy, Wm. Meade, and the writer of this; if there were others I cannot, at this distant day, recall their names. The day was cold and dark and dreary, but the bright fire from the old fashioned fire-place, shining upon the polished and-irons, sanded floor and cheerful faces of mine host and his guests in their gray uniforms and their burnished side arms leaning conveniently in the corners of the room, gave an air of comfort and snugness to the scene which contrasted favorably with the out-door
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A reminiscence of the Christmas of 1861. (search)
A reminiscence of the Christmas of 1861. By W. F. Shippey. It was Christmas day in the year 1861. A party of officers and soldiers of the old First Virginia Cavalry, then encamped near Bull Run, had assembled to celebrate the day at Stuart's Tavern, on the Little River Turnpike. The party was composed of Captain Jas. H. Drake, Captain Irving, Lieutenant Larrick, Dave and Gash Drake, Wm. Guy, Wm. Meade, and the writer of this; if there were others I cannot, at this distant day, recall their names. The day was cold and dark and dreary, but the bright fire from the old fashioned fire-place, shining upon the polished and-irons, sanded floor and cheerful faces of mine host and his guests in their gray uniforms and their burnished side arms leaning conveniently in the corners of the room, gave an air of comfort and snugness to the scene which contrasted favorably with the out-door gloom, and gave something like a home feeling to the soldiers who, for several months, had known nothi
. Williams on or about the 18th day of June, 1861. I was persuaded to do so by a negro man, named Guy, belonging to Mr. James J. Hines. I saw Guy on Mr. Hines' place two or three times, and he persuGuy on Mr. Hines' place two or three times, and he persuaded me to kill Mr. Williams, and I agreed to do so. I saw Guy the same morning I killed Mr. Williams--he told me to stand in the bushes close to the bridge, and that Mr. Williams would cross the briGuy the same morning I killed Mr. Williams--he told me to stand in the bushes close to the bridge, and that Mr. Williams would cross the bridge. Guy then went to the field. After I had killed Mr. Williams I went to the field and saw Guy and told him I had killed Mr. Williams. I then asked Frank for a hoe to bury Mr. Williams, telling Guy then went to the field. After I had killed Mr. Williams I went to the field and saw Guy and told him I had killed Mr. Williams. I then asked Frank for a hoe to bury Mr. Williams, telling him I had killed him; he told me I would find one under an old house. I buried Mr. Williams by myself, about 60 or 70 yards below the Dean Forest Bridge. He was shot on the opposite side of the canGuy and told him I had killed Mr. Williams. I then asked Frank for a hoe to bury Mr. Williams, telling him I had killed him; he told me I would find one under an old house. I buried Mr. Williams by myself, about 60 or 70 yards below the Dean Forest Bridge. He was shot on the opposite side of the canal — he was shot with a double-barrel gun, loaded with buckshot. "I met Frank, a slave of Mr. J. J. Hines, in the month of March, and told him if Mr. Williams did not mind I would kill him. He
Mayor's Court, Monday,July 22. --George Webster, from Maryland, wandering about the streets — no place to stay --committed.--Edward, slave of H. B. Holmes, committed for going at large.-- Isaac Cooper, Henrico darkey, living in the city without a register — set to work.-- Ezekiel Ruffin, no papers — set to work.--Charles Freeman, no papers and drunk-- committed.--Sarah A. J se, white, associating with Billy, a slave --committed. William Guy, committed to 23d for shooting and wounding Wm. Myers.--Henry Bowen, assaulting Richard P. Mundin — acquitted.--Michael McCrony, acquitted of an alleged assault on Mrs. Mary Ann Sexton, on 20th street.--Benjamin Bolton, bailed to appear on the 26th for assaulting and beating Adam W
Delivered to his officer. --William Guy, the soldier charged with shooting and wounding Wm. Myers, was yesterday delivered to Col. Wigfall, of the Texas battalion, to be dealt with according to military law.
Arrest on a serious charge. --The police yesterday evening caged a man named Frank, alias William Guy, as one of the murderers of Patrick Kelly. It will be remembered that Richard Duff and others are already in custody for killing both Kelly and Downes, who were members of Read's heavy artillery company, and whose mysterious murder on 17th street, a few weeks since, by unrecognized ruffians, threw the whole city into a fever of excitement. The evidence against Guy, if indeed he prove onilliam Guy, as one of the murderers of Patrick Kelly. It will be remembered that Richard Duff and others are already in custody for killing both Kelly and Downes, who were members of Read's heavy artillery company, and whose mysterious murder on 17th street, a few weeks since, by unrecognized ruffians, threw the whole city into a fever of excitement. The evidence against Guy, if indeed he prove one of the assassins, will be elicited on his examination this morning before the Head of Police.
d repairing to the rear of the prison, prevented it from being entirely evacuated by its enterprising inhabitants. Up to sundown last night none of the parties had been arrested. The City Sergeant will give $25 a piece for each one brought to him. The wall they burrowed under was not long since built up with stone, under the direction of the City Engineer, at an expense of $800. We append a list of the fugacious jail birds: John Fritz Kriebel and John E. Lelimoney, murder of Philip Sautter; George W. Nelson, robbery; Julius Shally, do.; Geo. W. Cassady, several cases of grand larceny; Richard Duff and Dan. Broderick, murder of two men in Butchertown; James Coyne alias Finnoven, murder and burglary; Wm. Guy grand larceny; Chas. Foster alias George Rigby, horse stealing; Wm. Amey, grand larceny; James M. Armour, murder of Ed. Dunn; Mike Shehan, highway robbery; Mike M. McLaughlin, horse stealing; Thomas F. Eanes, felonious cutting and assault. The city jail is notoriously insecure.
Mr. Chas. Pearson, a clerk in the Pay office, made statements corroborating that of Major Andrews. No further evidence could be obtained on account of the absence from the city of other important witnesses. For want of bail in the amount of $7,500, the prisoner was committed to jail for trial at the next term of the C. S. District Court. Hustings Court.--Judge Lyons presiding. On Monday the Grand Jury found true bills in the following cases: George Jones, Casher McCormack. Wm. Guy, Albert. Tappan, Antoni Solice, Mary Sullivan, (three cases,) Edgar Hermand, Thos. F. Eanes, John McAually, Wm. Avery, Michael Hines, Britton Allen, Dan'l Murphy, Robt. Burch, Edw. Flinn, Jas. Brown, Wm. Tracy, and Wm. Smith — all of whom are charged with felony. The Jury then adjourned until Wednesday, 24th inst. Yesterday, Wm. Tracy alias William Smith. was tried for stabbing, feloniously, John McClure. He was found guilty, and sent to the penitentiary for four years. Mary Su
the military laws of the Confederate States. William, a slave, for beating Dummy, a deaf and dumb free negress, about the head with a rock, was ordered twenty lashes. Judge Lyons Court.--This Court sat yesterday. Much civil business was attended to. We noticed that upon the petition of Major Marabel, showing his arrest and illegal confinement by Gen. John H. Winder, a wait of habeas corpus was ordered to be issued commanding Gen. Winder to bring the body of Maj. Marabel before the Court to-day at 10 o'clock. Casper McCormack was tried for felony and found guilty, his punishment was fixed at two years confinement in the penitentiary. Robert Burch, also indicted for felony, was acquitted. A summons was issued requiring several jurors, who failed to be present, to appear to morrow, and show cause why they should not be fined. The cases of Michael Hines, John McAnally, Daniel Murphy, and Wm. Guy are set for trial to-day. The Court will open at 10 o'clock.
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