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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 39: capture of the regiment. (search)
us. Levi Woofindale. George B. Symonds. Michael Broderick. John P. Driscoll. Benjamin Lummus. John Restell, Jr. Joshua Very. James Shinnick. Charles Becker. SergeantJames S. Smith. William Blake. James Harvey. Edwin B. Pratt. CorporalWilliam P. Edwards. Stephen J. Younger. Benjamin F. Adams. John Lee (Co. F.) John Lee (Co. I.) Job Foster. William Richardson. James Beatty. Richard Doherty. Thomas Meagher. Edward Joy. James Smith. William Smith. Peter Johnson. John Hagan. Ernest Krantz. Edward McKenna. Eben D. Poole. William Farnham. Charles Dean. These 67 recruits had been forwarded to the regiment only the day before and were captured with the others. Co. A.Robert Boyd. Herman Weitzler. Robert A. Johnston. Bernard Van Ammon. Solomon Salter. Doffles Goarout. Carl Rummelsburg. Co. B.Joseph Richardson. William Doyle. Henry M. Allen. Charles Edwards. M. Sweeney. John McKane. John Scott. Co. C.Charles Belcher, Jr. Richard Meagher.
g lost 21 men missing, 9 wounded and 2 killed. Only three of the original regiment was in service at this time. Casualties at Reams Station, Aug. 25, 1864. Co. F.Capt. Isaac N. Mudgett, captured by the enemy. Co. H.Private John Lee, wounded. Co. D.Private George Soper, wounded. missing in action: Co. A.Private Benjamin Adams, James E. Beatty William Robinson B.Wm. P. Edwards Richard Doherty Stephen J. Younger C.Wm. Farnham Job Foster Wm. Richardson Eben D. Poole D.John Hagan Edward Joy E.Peter Johnson F.John Lee James Smith Thomas Meagher H.Edward McKenna Sydney Smith Earnest Krantz Charles Dean Joseph Hill These casualties occurred during the last charge of the enemy which took place at dark and they were all marked Missing in Action. They were captured, confined in Libby Prison anti paroled on Sept. 24th, 1864. On the 30th of August the command went into camp in the vicinity of the Williams House, and while there the discharge of 90 men, w
.......................................................... 188 Grieve, Thomas, .................................................. 107, 119 Grover, General, ...................................................... 95 Guilford, Joseph A.,................................................. 18 Guilfoyle, Dennis, .......................... 106 Guinan, P. R.,.................................................... 100, 107 Gum Springs, Va.,.................................................... 215 Hagan, John, ......................................................331, 348 Hagedon, Henry, ..................................................... 292 Hagerstown Turnpike, Md., .......................................... 135, 139 Hagerty, Patrick, ................................................... 104, 186 Hale, Henry A., 4, 5, 7, 25, 30, 43, 62, 112, 114, 141, 144, 151, 191, 195, 198, 200, 257, 261, 299, 324, 334, 344 Haley, Charles A., .................................................... 146
rted at this time that he had 58 men bearing arms in the Thirteenth. Major Austin reported that, reinforced by two companies, he had suffered a loss of 26 killed out of a total of 85 effective in the stubborn fight he made against Hooker's advance at New Hope. He mentioned with honor the names of Sergt.-Maj. Augustus O'Duhigg, dangerously wounded in most gallant action; Captain Lowd and Lieutenant Greany; and Lieut. A. T. Martin, alone in command of Company B; Sergt. James Delany and Privates John Hagan, Richard Kiely and J. B. Mc-Graw, for great gallantry at New Hope church. The gallant Austin, capable of commanding a regiment, had 60 men at Dalton, and had lost 23. Colonel Lewis mentioned in addition to names already given, AssistantSur-geon Bass as greatly distinguished, and Sergeant-Major Bradford, wounded. Capt. Robert L. Keen was now in command of the Twentieth. Scott's brigade reached Resaca May 10th, when Mc-Pherson's corps was four miles distant, intent on cutting off t
expected to visit his wife the next day. Our loss is heavy, but his gain great. May his wife, whom he loved so tenderly, be comforted in the recollection of his many virtues, his piety, his worth, his love. Brigadier-General James Hagan was born in Ireland in 1821, and came with his parents to America in his infancy. The family settled in Pennsylvania, where his father engaged in farming. So James Hagan grew up to manhood in that State. He then entered business life with his uncle, John Hagan, a rich merchant of New Orleans, and soon afterward became connected with a branch of his uncle's house in the city of Mobile. At the beginning of the war with Mexico he and other gallant young men from Alabama joined Colonel Hays' Texas Rangers, and were engaged in the storming of Monterey. Subsequently commissioned captain of the Third dragoons, he served in that rank in the army of General Taylor. Returning from Mexico, he gave his attention to planting. When the war between the Sta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Cadet Lavergne, Jules Dreux, Pierre Lambert, Edmond Dreux, Celestin Durand, Victor Barbot, Prosper Fleury, Jean B. Davis, Jules Dauphin, of the Dragoons. Robert Guichard, Thomas Fourcade, Gabriel Toledano, Bertrand Frederic, Raphael Toledano, Valere St. Germain, Laurent Le Vasseur, Lionis Mortimer, Joseph Toledano, Paul Hoffman, Alexis Guillemin, Georges Boullemet, Pierre Landreaux, Louis Lafite, Hippolite Lagan, Pierre Rousseau, Ant. Dicharry, Desire Barthelmy, of the Sharpshooters. John Hagan, Philip Laidlaw, James Prior, Josiah Whitney, John Sharp, Chas. Dameron, Arthur O'Neall, James Hall, Christopher Hays, Jere Lambert, Dan Jourdan, John Arstrong, Alfred Moore, H. William Palfrey, Ralph McCracken, Lynster O'Donnell, J. C. Nicholls, Wm. McClelland, John McClelland, Thaddeus Nicholls, William Smith, Simon White, C. Ralph Jones. Lee Whitehead, Pat O'Meara, of the Louisiana Blues. Alexandre Shomerg, J. Baptiste Lepretre, Gabriel Montamat, Auguste McClelland, Fabre Daunoy, Be
Freedom of speech. --John Hagan, charged with being disorderly and using profane language in the street, appeared before the Mayor yesterday. It seems that John, who is an ardent Breckinridge man, was talking politics with his acquaintances, when officer Seal came along and informed them that they were too boisterous, and must desist. Mr. Hagan claimed the right of speech; words waxed warm between them, and, it was deposed, he cussed the officer. He was then taken from his buggy by the policemen who had assembled, and escorted to the watch-house. The Mayor would doubtless have disposed of the case in his Court, but the accused expressed a willingn doubtless have disposed of the case in his Court, but the accused expressed a willingness to have the question of his constitutional rights tested, and it was thereupon sent to the Grand Jury. Mr. Hagan maintains that in this time of political excitement, all citizens have the privilege of a free and loud expression of opinion.
e and Anderson. Martin Mueller, a native of Germany, took the requisite oaths and was admitted a citizen of the United States. In the case of Wm. Cavenagh, Thos. Devlin and Jas. McCorson, indicted for misdemeanors, the prosecution was abated as to Devlin, defendant, being dead. The other parties being put on trial and found guilty.--Cavenagh was fined $10 and McCorson $5, with costs, and ordered to 30 days imprisonment, and thereafter until said fine be paid. In the case of John Hagan, indicted for abusing officer Seal while in the discharge of his duty, a rule was awarded against J. Callahan, J. Wright, and Dr. Picot, his witnesses, for non- attendance. In the case of Henry Flowers, for misdemeanor, a rule was awarded against Michael Fleming, a recusant witness, returnable forthwith. Oliver Crosmore, indicted for misdemeanor, gave $200 bail for his appearance at the next term, with R. M. Lowry as bailsman; in a similar case, Jno. McDonough gave $150 bail for
Husting Court--Friday, Feb. 15th. --Present: Aldermen Sanxay, Bray, Sadler, Hill, Timberlake and Anderson. A nolle prosequi was entered in the case of Henry Flowers, indicted for misdemeanor.--The same course was pursued in relation to Henry Burruss, a free negro, indicted for remaining in the State contrary to law. Wm. M. Fisher, indicted for habitually carrying concealed weapons, gave $100 security for his appearance at the next term, and was discharged from custody. John Hagan, indicted for abusing officer Seal while in the discharge of his duty, was put on trial, and the jury having heard the evidence and retired, returned and reported to the Court that they were unable to agree, whereupon one of the jury was withdrawn, and the case was continued until the next term. The prosecution against Wm. G. Pollard for allowing his slave to go at large, was dismissed. Wm. Cavanagh and Jas. McCorson, heretofore fined for misdemeanor, paid the same and were disch
Superintendent of the Gas Works Richmond. March 28, 1861. To Messrs. T. C. Burns, Thomas Faberty, Hagan's John, J. C. Strockin, and others: Gentlemen --Your request that I should announce myself a candidate for the office of Superintendent of the City Gas Works is before me. I readily comply with it, and hereby declare myself a candidate. If elected, I will use every endeavor to subserve the interests of the city. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't. Thos. R. Sharp. mh 20--tde*
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