Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Hagood or search for Hagood in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
ction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was granted. On the morning of the 10th I received advices by signal from General Kautz announcing his return with his entire command. He had failed to reach Hicksford, but had burned the Stony Creek bridge, the Nottoway Bridge, and Jarratt's Station, and captured about one hundred and thirty prisoners, with a loss to his
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
's arrival Beauregard had under his command at Petersburg twenty-two hundred effective men. The line was seven and one half miles long, and these troops occupied three miles of it, leaving four and one half miles undefended. On the Bermuda Hundred front was Jackson's division less Ransom's and Gracie's brigades, giving him thirty-two hundred men there, or a total force of fifty-four hundred on that front and in Petersburg. Hoke's division was ordered to him at 11.30 A. M., on the 15th, and Hagood's brigade thereof reached Petersburg just after Smith's fight at seven o'clock and the capture of the batteries. They were followed by two other brigades within a few hours. At 10.20 P. M. of the 15th, General Beauregard ordered the abandonment of the Bermuda Hundred lines, and the removal of that portion of Johnson's division to Petersburg. Johnson evacuated the Bermuda Hundred line at dawn on the 16th, and arrived in Petersburg at 10 A. M. Thus reinforced, Beauregard had an effective fo
ork, pressed up to the edge of the ditch, and captured a flag which had been cut down by a shell from the navy. It is a mistake, as was at first reported to me, that any soldier entered the fort. An orderly was killed about a third of a mile from the fort, and his horse taken. In the meantime the remainder of Ames' division had captured two hundred and eighteen men and ten commissioned officers of the North Carolina reserves, and other prisoners. From them I learned that Kirkland's and Hagood's brigades of Hoke's division had left the front of the Army of the James, near Richmond, and were then within two miles of the rear of my forces, and their skirmishers were then actually engaged, and that the remainder of Hoke's division had come the night before to Wilmington, and were then on the march, if they had not already arrived. I learned, also, that these troops had left Richmond on Tuesday, the 20th. Knowing the strength of Hoke's division, I found a force opposed to me out