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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 2 0 Browse Search
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l supplied with tidings of every Union move of consequence—tidings only too quickly carried by daring and devoted sons of the South, who courted instant death by accepting duty in the Secret Service, and lived the lonely life, and in many an instance died the lonely, unhallowed death of the spy. Men who sought that calling must have had illimitable love for and faith in the cause for which they accepted the ignominy that, justly or unjustly, attaches to the name. Men like Major Andre and Nathan Hale had succeeded in throwing about their hapless fate the glamour of romance and martyrdom, but such halos seem to have hovered over the head of few, if ally, who, in either army during the bitter four years war, were condemned to die, by the felon's rope, the death of the spy. The Old Capitol Prison in Washington was long the abiding place of men and women confined by order of our Iron Secretary on well-founded suspicion of being connected with the Southern system, and in the Camp of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Congress, National (search)
of it. Senator Jefferson Davis spoke of it as having the characteristics of a diplomatic paper, for diplomacy is said to abhor certainty, as nature abhors a vacuum, and it is not in the power of man to reach any conclusion from that message. Senator Hale, of New Hampshire, said that if he understood the message on the subject of secession, it was this: South Carolina has just cause for seceding from the Union; that is the first proposition. The second is that she has no right to secede. The nment and the Union. Mr. Crittenden's mild rebuke and earnest appeal to the patriotism of the Senate were met by more scornful words from other Senators, in which the speakers seemed to emulate each other in the utterance of seditious words. Senator Hale replied with stinging words to Clingman's remarks, which aroused the anger of the Southern members. He had said, The plain, true way is to look this thing in the face—see where we are. The extremists thought so too, and cast off all disguise
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gerhardt, Karl 1853- (search)
Gerhardt, Karl 1853- Sculptor; born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 7, 1853. He has made a specialty of portraiture. Among his works are busts of General Grant, Henry Ward Beecher, Mark Twain, and statues of General Putnam, Nathan Hale, and John Fitch.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hale, Nathan 1755- (search)
Hale, Nathan 1755- Patriot; born in Coventry, Conn., June 6, 1755; graduated at Yale College in 1773; and taught school till the fight in Lexington prompted him The Hale Homestead. to join Col., where Washington had his headquarters for a brief time while retreating towards Harlem Heights, Hale received instructions on duty from the commander-in-chief. He entered the British camp on Long Iarshal (Cunningham) the next morning (Sept. 22, 1776) to be hanged. That infamous officer denied Hale the services of a clergyman and the use of a Bible; but the more humane officer who superintended his victim, while tears and sobs marked the sympathy of the spectators. With unfaltering voice, Hale said, at the last mo- Hale's execution. ment, I only regret that I have but one life to lose fmo- Hale's execution. ment, I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country. Statues of the patriot have been erected in the capitol in Hartford and in City Hall Park, New York City.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), MacMONNIESonnies, Frederick William 1863- (search)
orn in Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 30, 1863; received a common school education; entered the studio of Augustus St. Gaudens in 1880: studied for four years in the life classes of the Academy of Design and Art Students' League, and completed his art education abroad, studying in Munich in the atelier of Falguiere; in the École des Beaux Arts, in Paris, and in the private studio of Antonin Mereie: received the prix d'atelier, the highest prize open to foreigners; opened a, studio of his own in Paris; and in 1896 received the Cross of the Legion of Honor. His principal works are the famous statue of Bacchante, which he gave to C. F. McKim, who in 1897 presented it to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City; the fountain at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago; the statue of Nathan Hale, in City Hall Park, New York: Fame, at West Point; Diana: Pan of Rohallion: the quadriga for the Brooklyn Memorial Arch; the two bronze eagles for the entrance to Prospect Park, Brooklyn, etc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolutionary War, (search)
of Long Island Aug. 27, 1776 Washington withdraws his forces from Long Island to the city of New York.Aug. 29-30, 1776 Congress resolves that all Continental commissions in which heretofore the words United colonies have been used, bear hereafter the words United States Sept. 9, 1776 Americans evacuate New York CitySept. 14, 1776 British repulsed at Harlem HeightsSept. 16, 1776 Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, and Arthur Lee appointed ambassadors to the Court of France Sept. 22, 1776 Nathan Hale executed as a spy at New York Sept. 22, 1776 Battle on Lake Champlain; British victory Oct. 11-13, 1776 Thaddeus Kosciuszko, a Pole, arrives; recommended to Washington by Dr. Franklin; appointed colonel of engineers by Congress Oct. 18, 1776 Battle of White Plains, N. Y.; British victory Oct. 28, 1776 Franklin sails for France in the Reprisal, of sixteen guns, one of the new Continental frigates, the first national vessel to appear in the Eastern Hemisphere Oct., 1776 Congress author
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
hips; it is estimated that 11,400 American prisoners died in them during six years beginning......1776 New York City evacuated, occupied by the British......Sept. 14, 1776 Battle of Harlem Heights; British repulsed......Sept. 16, 1776 Nathan Hale executed as a spy at New York by command of General Howe......Sept. 22, 1776 Fleet on Lake Champlain under Benedict Arnold meets a vastly superior British armament under Captain Pringle, and is defeated with a loss of about ninety men...... State monument dedicated on the battlefield of Gettysburg......July 2, 1893 Hamilton Fish, born, 1808, dies at Garrison's, N. Y.......Sept. 7, 1893 Vigilant-Valkyrie yacht races for the America's cup......Oct. 7-13, 1893 Statue of Nathan Hale unveiled......Nov. 25, 1893 The court of appeals decided that foreign corporations could buy and sell real estate in New York......Jan. 16, 1894 [This decision affected $25,000,000 worth of property.] John Y. McKane, of Gravesend, L.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Westminster Abbey. (search)
I need not dwell upon them. His one Monument to Major Andre, Westminster Abbey. desire was that he should not be regarded as a spy, and that he should be shot as a soldier, not hung as a felon. But Provost-Marshal Cunningham had hung Capt. Nathan Hale, and hence Andre pleaded in vain in his letter to Washington that he had agreed to meet a person (Arnold or his agent) who was to give him intelligence upon ground not within the posts of either army. Against my stipulation, he said, my intention, and without my knowledge, I was conducted within one of your posts. Surely, he said to Major Tallmadge, you do not consider Hale's case and mine alike. Yes, replied the American major, precisely similar, and similar will be your fate. How much he won the sympathy and affection of his captors by his frankness and courage; how Washington thought him more unfortunate than guilty, and with his own hands closed the shutters of his room from which the gibbet at Tappan was visible; how u
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, James -1798 (search)
and this right is secured to them both by the letter and the spirit of the British constitution, by which the measures and the conditions of their obedience are appointed. The British liberties, sir, and the means and the right of defending them, are not the grants of princes; and of what our princes never granted they surely can never deprive us.... Id rex potest, says the law, quod de jure potest. The King's power is a power according to law. His commands, if the authority of Lord Chief-Justice Hale may be depended upon, are under the directive power of the law, and consequently invalid if unlawful. Commissions, says my Lord Coke. are legal, and are like the King's writs; and none are lawful but such as are allowed by the common law or warranted by some act of Parliament. And now, sir, let me appeal to the impartial tribunal of reason and truth; let me appeal to every unprejudiced and judicious observer of the laws of Britain, and of the constitution of the British governme
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
ice, he is bound to legislate for the whole country, not a sectional part; that the constitutional rights of others must be respected; and all this his good sense will soon teach him, if he needs to be taught. Again, we say, we do not yet despair of the Union. Massachusetts might have seated in the Senate a man far more objectionable than Charles Sumner! Vive la Republique! The next day after the election, the Daily Advertiser, then under the control of the well-known journalist, Mr. Nathan Hale, used the following severe language, which referred, however, to the coalition in the Legislature by which the election was secured, and having no reference to the personal fitness of Mr. Sumner for the position: It is the grossest outrage upon the feelings of the majority of the people of the State, by a combination between two minorities, which we have known to be perpetrated in any of the States of the Union. We regard the event as a most unfortunate one for the reputation of th
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