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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 23 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 17 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 11 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 10 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Edward Everett Hale or search for Edward Everett Hale in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 8 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
young club; and then she would tell how Florence Nightingale cut the Gordian knots of red tape in the Crimea. Did the constitution enforce such and such limits? Ah! but committees were not thus limited; let a committee be appointed, to do what the club could not! (This was what the Doctor called whipping the devil round the stump! ) Many and many a reform had its beginning in one of those quiet Park Street rooms of the N. E. W. C. When I want anything in Boston remedied, said Edward Everett Hale, I go down to the New England Woman's Club! When the General Federation of Women's Clubs was formed in 1892, our mother served on the board of directors for four years, and was then made an honorary vice-president. She was also president of the Massachusetts State Federation from 1893 to 1898, and thereafter honorary president Dr. Holmes once said to her, Mrs. Howe, I consider you eminently clubable ; and he added that he himself was not. He told us why, when he adopted the tit
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
feeling poorly. Did not let Maud know of my hurt. Went to the dinner mentioned above, which was at the Vendome.... Was taken in to dinner by the President, Mr. Fitz. Robert Collyer had the place on my right. He was delightful as ever. Edward Everett Hale sat near me and talked with me from time to time. Of course my speech afflicted me. I got through it, however, but had to lose the other speeches, the hour being so late and the night so inclement, very rainy. February 20. Very lame tha gesture of perfect grace. The eldest chief, before this salute, held her hand a moment, and blew across the palm, east and west. Daughter, he said, our paths have crossed here. May yours be bright hereafterl April 1. To-day Edward [Everett] Hale brought me a parting memento of the Zufiis — the basket with which they had dipped up the water from the ocean of sunrise. Mr. Cushing sent this. E. E. H. also spoke about five hymns which should be written corresponding to the five great hymns
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
ds, for old ones were growing fewer. Side by side in the Journal with the mention of this one or that comes more and more frequently the record of the passing of some dear companion on life's journey. Those who were left of the great band that made New England glorious in the nineteenth century held closely to each other, and the bond between them had a touching significance. Across the street lived Oliver Wendell Holmes; in Cambridge was Thomas Wentworth Higginson; in Dorchester, Edward Everett Hale. In a letter to her brother she speaks of the constant tear and trot of my Boston life, in which I try to make all ends meet, domestic, social, artistic, and reformatory, and go about, I sometimes think, like a poor spider who spins no web .... Marion has been very industrious, and is full of good work and of cheer. His book [ Mr. Isaacs ] has been such a success as to give him at once a recognized position, of which the best feature, economically, is that it enables him to comman
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: seventy years young 1889-1890; aet. 70-71 (search)
sail on the 18th. Pray accept my thanks and regrets and make them acceptable to your children. Faithfully yours, James Russell Lowell. The Journal thus notes the occasion. My seventieth birthday. A very busy day for all of us.... My head was dressed at eleven. All my children were here, with daughter-and sons-in-law. I had many lovely gifts. The house was like a garden of costly flowers. Breakfast was at 12.30; was in very good style. Guests: General Walker, John S. Dwight, E. E. Hale, Mrs. Jack Gardner, Mmes. Bell, Pratt, and Agassiz. Walker made the first speech at the table, H. M. H. Henry Marion Howe. being toastmaster. Walker seemed to speak very feelingly, calling me the first citizeness of the country; stood silent a little and sat down. Dwight read a delightful poem; Hale left too soon to do anything. H. introduced J. S. D. thus: Sweetness and light, your name is Dwight. While we sat at table, baskets and bouquets of wonderful flowers kept constantly ar
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
Edwin Arlington Robinson, author of Captain Craig, etc. opinion would be worth having, also. I think I shall consult E. E. Hale, albeit the two just named would be more fastidious. the facsimile printed in the reminiscences contains the discarden their flint and steel struck, the flash was laughter. It May have been at the Authors' Club that the two, with Edward Everett Hale and Dr. Holmes, were receiving compliments and tributes one afternoon. at least, she cried, no one can say thatow to do this, but suddenly I thought of mother Goose's when the pie was opened, the birds began to sing. so when Edward Everett Hale came forward with me and introduced me as the youngest person in the hall, I said, ladies and gentlemen, I shall g a quotation from mother Goose [ when the pie was opened, etc.], and the first bird that I shall introduce will be Rev. E. E. Hale. beginning thus, I introduced T. W. Higginson as the great American Eagle; Judge [Robert] Grant as a mocking-bird;
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
ital religious power which is rare and most precious. Before he had spoken I had been asking in my mind, how can we make the past present to us? The Easter service and Lent also seem intended to do this, but our imaginations droop and lag behind our desires... April 2. ... Went in the evening to see Ren-Hur with kind Sarah Jewett — her treat, as was my attendance at the opera. The play was altogether spectacular, but very good in that line.... April 3.... Went to the celebration of E. E. Hale's eightieth birthday, in which the community largely participated. Senator Hoar was the orator and spoke finely.... Hale's response was manly, cheery, and devout. He has certainly done much good work, and has suggested many good things. April 12. Lunch with Mrs. Wheelwright. I found Agnes Repplier very agreeable. She had known the wife of Green, the historian, very, almost too brilliant. Told me something about his life. I enjoyed meeting her. To Laura Yes, I likes my chill
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
o Boston to read my poem for Old Home Week. Worse than this is my trouble about two poems sent me while in Boston, with original music, to be presented to the committee for Home Week, which I have entirely forgotten and neglected. To do this was far from my intention, but my old head fairly gave out in the confusion of the various occasions in which I was obliged to take an active part. She yielded to entreaty and stayed at home, and was rewarded by a most gratifying letter from Edward Everett Hale, telling me that Josiah Quincy read my poem with real feeling, and that it was warmly received. My prayer is answered. I have lived to see my dear girl again. ... I give thanks earnestly and heartily, but seem for a time paralyzed by her presence. With the early autumn came a great pleasure in a visit to the new Green Peace, the house which her son had built at Bedford Hills, New York. She was delighted with the house and garden; the Journal tells of all manner of pleasant gay
, 170. Greene, Wm. B., I, 366. Greenhalge, Frederick, II, 191, 200. Gregory XVI, I, 95. Griggs, E. H., II, 297. Grisi, Giulia, I, 86, 87, 316; II, 250, 350. Griswold, Rufus, I, 17, 131. Groton, II, 62. Guild, Mrs., Charles, II, 295. Guild, Sam, I, 124. Guizot, F. P. G., I, 97, 272. Gulesian, N. H., II, 190, 216. Gurowski, Count, I, 246, 259. Gustine, Mrs., I, 386, 387. Hague, II, 10, 11, 172. Hague Conferences, II, 381. Hahn, Dr., I, 272. Hale, E. E., I, 294; II, 62, 75, 81, 150, 194, 268, 272, 273, 299, 364. Hale, Sarah, I, 128. Halifax, I, 80. Hall, Alice, II, 294, 339, 362. Hall, Anne, I, 64. Hall, Caroline, see Birckhead. Hall, D. P., I, 263, 297; II, 294, 340, 362, 363, 368. Hall, Eleanor, II, 385. Hall, Florence Howe, I, 112-17, 119, 122, 126, 128, 133, 147, 161, 163, 169, 170, 196, 201, 202, 216, 222, 237, 238, 263, 265, 277, 279, 297, 340, 341, 343, 349; II, 46, 57, 67, 68, 116, 119, 123, 124, 158, 195,