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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Nathan Hale or search for Nathan Hale in all documents.

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s the respect of jurists wherever the common law is administered. Neither the chief-justice nor Peleg Sprague, another highly esteemed judge, showed to advantage in cases where the rights of alleged fugitive slaves were concerned,—the former wanting in courage, and the latter exhibiting a partisan zeal in supporting the Fugitive Slave Act. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pp. 186, 196. The representative newspaper was the Daily Advertiser, long directed by a public-spirited citizen, Nathan Hale, assisted by his son, the junior of that name; but as one turns its files, he can see at a glance how repugnant to its management were all novelties in the shape of moral and political reforms. The names of journals existing at present in Boston indicate no identity in management or views with those of former days, as there have been several transfers, with no attempt to preserve continuity in politics or otherwise. There was but one society at that period to which admission was so
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
s observed that while he was describing the character and work of the four illustrious men, his thought was all the while on the causes of peace and freedom which he had espoused. One report says: He spoke without notes, and with a clear and distinct elocution and easy manner, enchanting the attention of the audience for two hours. He was frequently interrupted by impassioned applause, and carried with him throughout the earnest attention and apparently the sympathy of the audience. Nathan Hale, Jr., in the Boston Advertiser, Aug. 28, 1846. Boston Atlas, August 28. E. P. Whipple, in the Boston Courier, August 28, noted the vitality of the oration as pre-eminently deserving attention, and how it came warm from the orator's own nature in the very language of thought and feeling. A large part of the audience were without seats, but their attention was unwearied to the end. As he concluded, many gathered about him to give their congratulations,—among them the venerable Ex-President Ad
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
usetts. Your energy and counsels are valuable, and I am glad that they will be felt by the convention. The convention was a representative body well worthy of the State. The Boston delegation included, among lawyers, Rufus Choate, Sidney Bartlett, F. B. Crowninshield, George S. Hillard, Thomas Hopkinson, Samuel D. Parker, George Morey, and Judge Peleg Sprague; among physicians, Jacob Bigelow and George Hayward; among clergymen, Samuel K. Lothrop and George W. Blagden; among editors, Nathan Hale, William Schouler, and J. S. Sleeper; and among merchants, William Appleton, Samuel A. Eliot, John C. Gray, J. Thomas Stevenson, and George B. Upton. Cambridge sent two jurists, Simon Greenleaf and Joel Parker, a former and a present professor in the Law School. Salem sent Otis P. Lord, later a judge; and Pittsfield, George N. Briggs. Against this array of Whigs was an equally formidable list of Democrats and Free Soilers. Among the former were Banks, Boutwell, Hallett, B. F. Butler