Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for S. F. Hale or search for S. F. Hale in all documents.

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ess, and heroic fortitude, gave eclat to our attacks upon the enemy, and averted the dangers of a final overthrow. Major Palmer, and the cavalry officers under him, who, by their daring intrepidity, made the effectiveness of that corps all that it could be upon such a field in supporting batteries, feeling the enemy's position, and covering our retreat. Major Reynolds of the marines, whose zealous efforts were well sustained by his subordinates, two of whom, Brevet-Major Zulin and Lieutenant Hale, were wounded, and one, Lieutenant Hitchcock, lost his life. Colonel H. W. Slocum, who was wounded while leading his gallant 27th New York to the charge, and Major J. J. Bartlett, who subsequently commanded it, and by his enthusiasm and valor kept it in action, and out of the panic. His conduct was imitated by his subordinates, of whom two, Capt. N. O. Rogers and Lieutenant N. C. Jackson, were wounded, and one ensign, Asa Park, was killed. In the last attack, Colonel H. M. Wood,
ble. 5.J. M. Morehead. 6.R. C. Puryer. 7.Burton Craige. 8.E. A. Davidson. Alabama. 1.R. W. Walker. 2.R. H. Smith. 3.J. L. M. Curry. 4.W. P. Chilton. 5.S. F. Hale. 6.Collin S. McRae. 7.John Gill Shorter. 8.David P. Lewis. 9.Thomas Fearn. Florida. 1.Jackson Morton. 2.J. P. Anderson. 3.J. B. Owens. Georgia. 1.Robe, Barnwell, Kenner, Barry, McRae. On Commercial Affairs.--Messrs. Memminger, Crawford, De Clouet, Morton, Curry. On the Judiciary.--Messrs. Clayton, Withers, Hale, Cobb, Harris. On Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, Owens. On Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Kenan, Anderson. On-Messrs. Chesnut, Campbell, Marshall, Nisbet, Fearn. On Public Lands.--Messrs. Marshall, Harris, Fearn, Anderson, Wright. On Indian Affairs.--Messrs. Morton, Hale, Lewis, Keitt, Sparrow. On Printing.--Messrs. T. R. R. Cobb, Harrison, Miles, Chilton, Perkins. On Accounts.--Messrs. Owens, DeClouet, Campbell, Smith, Crawf
eft. Passing over a spur of high land which lies at the north end of the valley, they entered a valley, and began to ascend a hill moderately covered with trees and underwood, which was not, however, dense enough to be any impediment to the artillery. Capt. Wright, with three or four companies of mounted Home Guards, the only ones in the engagement, was sent to the left, across the creek, to cut off a party of horsemen visible on that side, near a house recently vacated by a Union man named Hale. Upon their approach, the rebels retired behind the south fence of a corn-field, and in the adjoining bush were soon visible swarms of men, whose fire threatened to be disastrous to the Home Guard cavalry should they approach. Through the thin stalks of the broom-corn, Capt. Wright had seen the ambuscade, and approached only near enough to draw their fire, when he withdrew, to induce them to follow him into the field, where he could charge upon them effectively. He repeated this movement t
eft. Passing over a spur of high land which lies at the north end of the valley, they entered a valley, and began to ascend a hill moderately covered with trees and underwood, which was not, however, dense enough to be any impediment to the artillery. Capt. Wright, with three or four companies of mounted Home Guards, the only ones in the engagement, was sent to the left, across the creek, to cut off a party of horsemen visible on that side, near a house recently vacated by a Union man named Hale. Upon their approach, the rebels retired behind the south fence of a corn-field, and in the adjoining bush were soon visible swarms of men, whose fire threatened to be disastrous to the Home Guard cavalry should they approach. Through the thin stalks of the broom-corn, Capt. Wright had seen the ambuscade, and approached only near enough to draw their fire, when he withdrew, to induce them to follow him into the field, where he could charge upon them effectively. He repeated this movement t