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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Warren D. C. Hall or search for Warren D. C. Hall in all documents.

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Barracks, amounting in all to about 420 men. April 8th.-In obedience to the above-mentioned order, General Atkinson set off for the Upper Mississippi, with six companies of the Sixth Infantry (220 men), which were embarked at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, in the steamboats Enterprise and Chieftain. April 10th.-Arrived at the rapids of the Des Moines about 2 P. M. Here the commanding officer was informed that the British band of Indians, under Mucatah-mich-i-ca-Kaik Spelled, by McKenny and Hall, Ma-ka-tai-she-klakiak. ( Indian tribes, vol. II.)(Black Hawk), had crossed the Mississippi to the east bank, near the mouth of the Lower Iowa River. This band consisted of four or five hundred well-appointed horsemen, besides men and boys, employed in transporting the canoes, capable of bearing arms, making an active and efficient force of between five and six hundred: the whole-men, women, and children-amounting to above two thousand souls. The ultimate intentions of Black Hawk were unkn
to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shoothe axe, are familiar to my hands, and that not for recreation, but for bread. He had but one near neighbor, Colonel Warren D. C. Hall, who, with his wife, rendered General Johnston's family every friendly office that kind hearts could suggest. Colonel Hall was one of Austin's colonists, and prominent in the earlier conflicts of the revolutionary struggle. He was elderly, and had not been fortunate; so that his large estate was laboring under embarrassments, from which I believe it was subwhen he fired. A twenty-pound gobbler dropped, one flew off, and the third escaped, evidently wounded. An hour later Colonel Hall came over, and mentioned that a wounded wild-turkey had run into his blacksmithshop at full speed and dropped dead. I
Chapter 11: Paymaster in United States Army. Reception at Galveston. reasons for retiring from the army. generosity to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shooting. close observation of the habits of animals. the crested Wood-Duck. the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of education. his Love of justice and breadth of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. illustrations of his character and plantation-life from his letters. letters giving his views of education. preference for an American training. notions on