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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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19. A song. by Fitz-Greene Halleck. Hark! a bugle's echo comes, Hark! a fife is singing, Hark I the roll of far-off drums, Through the air is ringing! Nearer the bugle's echo comes, Nearer the fife is singing, Near and more near the roll of drums Through the air is ringing. War! it is thy music proud, Wakening the brave-hearted, Memories — hopes — a glorious crowd, At its call have started. Memories of our sires of old, Who, oppression-driven, High their rainbow-flag unrolled To the sun and sky of heaven. Memories of the true and brave, Who, at honor's bidding, Stepped, their Country's life to save, To war as to their wedding. Memories of many a battle-plain, Where their life-blood flowing, Made green the grass and gold the grain, Above their grave-mounds growing. Hopes — that the children of their prayers, With them in valor vying, May do as noble deeds as theirs, In living and in dying: And make, for children yet to come, The land of their bequeathing The imperial and the peer<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cozzens, Frederick Swartwout 1818-1869 (search)
Cozzens, Frederick Swartwout 1818-1869 Author; born in New York City, March 5, 1818; entered mercantile life; and contributed to the Knickerbocker magazine a series of humorous articles called the Sparrowgrass papers. His other publications include Acadia: a sojourn among the Blue-noses; True history of New Plymouth; Memorial of Col. Peter A. Porter; and Memorial of Fitz-Greene Halleck. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 23, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cullum, George Washington 1809-1892 (search)
n the volunteer service he reached the rank of brigadier-general and brevet major-general during the Civil War. He was one of the most accomplished and useful officers of engineers in the United States army, as the military works he superintended the construction of attest. From 1845 to 1848 he was instructor of practical engineering in the West Point Military Academy, during which time he spent two years in Europe. He served as aidede-camp to General Scott in 1861, and on the staff of General Halleck in 1862, accompanying him to Washington. He was an efficient member of the United States sanitary commission, and superintendent of West Point Academy from 1864 to 1866. General Cullum published several books on military affairs, and a Biographical register of the officers and graduates of West Point (1st ed., 1868; 2d ed., 1879; 3d ed., revised and extended, 1891). He bequeathed $250,000 for the erection of a military memorial hall at West Point. He died in New York, Feb. 28, 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Halleck, Fitz-greene 1790-1867 (search)
Halleck, Fitz-greene 1790-1867 Poet; born in Guilford, Conn., July 8, 1790; became a clerk in the banking-house of Jacob Barker at the age of eighteen years; and was long a confidential clerk with John Jacob Astor, who made him one of the first trustees of the Astor Library. From early boyhood he wrote verses. With Joseph Rf the times, was published in 1821. The next year he went to Europe, and in 1827 his Alnwick Castle, Marco Bozzaris, and other poems were published in a volume. Halleck was a genuine poet, but he wrote comparatively little. His pieces of importance are only thirty-two in number, and altogether Fitz-Greene Halleck. comprise onlonly thirty-two in number, and altogether Fitz-Greene Halleck. comprise only about 4,000 lines. Yet he wrote with great facility. His Fanny, in the measure of Byron's Don Juan, was completed and printed within three weeks after it was begun. Late in life he joined the Roman Catholic Church. He died in Guilford, Nov. 19, 1867.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, James Grant 1832- (search)
attaining the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers; and at its close settled in New York City and engaged in literary work. He was author of Bryant and his friends; General Grant; Centennial history of the diocese of New York; Life of Fitz-Greene Halleck; Sketches of illustrious soldiers; editor of Fitz-Greene Halleck's poems; and, with Prof. John Fiske, of Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American biography; Great commanders series; and Memorial history of the City of New York; and president of its close settled in New York City and engaged in literary work. He was author of Bryant and his friends; General Grant; Centennial history of the diocese of New York; Life of Fitz-Greene Halleck; Sketches of illustrious soldiers; editor of Fitz-Greene Halleck's poems; and, with Prof. John Fiske, of Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American biography; Great commanders series; and Memorial history of the City of New York; and president of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society since 1885.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
Joseph Rodman Drake (1795-1820) and Fitz-Greene Halleck (1790-1867) are remembered first for a f the time, as Moore and the Smith brothers. Halleck is said to have written the last four lines ond it was on Drake, dead at twenty-five, that Halleck wrote what is the tenderest, the manliest litg man, and published posthumously (1835). Halleck was the one worthy American representative ofon's later manner. Indeed Byron, whose works Halleck subsequently edited, was his most kindred spiByronic crim.-cons., and the bluff and hearty Halleck was never cynical in his satire, and Byron wap. 374. who speaks, however, a truer word for Halleck than for Halleck's master. Fanny became at oHalleck's master. Fanny became at once popular, It was reprinted almost entire in Specimens of the American poets, London, 1822, in its pseudocomic phases. A detailed study of Halleck would reveal, as the chief source of his genuon and of intellectual criticism. Moreover, Halleck's Poems, including such unforgotten titles as[2 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Rivers, 314 Gyles, John, 7 H Hackett, J. H., 221, 228, 231 Haie, Edward, 1 Hakluyt, Richard, I, 3, 16, 18 Hall, Captain, Basil, 207 Hall, David, 96 Hall, James, 211, 318 Hallam, Henry, 250 Hallam, Lewis, 216, 218 Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 262, 276, 280, 281, 282-283 Hamilton, Alexander, 137, 146, 148, 149, 259 Hamilton, Dr., Alexander, 11-13 Hamilton, Governor, James, 250 Hamilton, Thomas, 207 Hamlet, 225, 265 Hamor, Ralph, 17 Hampden, John, 21 Hariot, Thom Plotinus, 266, 360 Plutarch, 93 Pocahontas, 17 Pocahontas, 225 Pocahontas or the settlers of Virginia, 221, 225 Poe, Edgar Allan, 181, 261, 266, 273, 275, 280, 313, 324 Poems (Bryant), 260 n., 269 n., 270 n., 271 n. Poems (Halleck), 283 Poems of Arouet, 178 Poems, dramatic and miscellaneous (Mercy Warren), 179 Poem on the happiness of America, 169 Poems by several hands (1744), 159, 160 Poems on several occasions, etc. (Rev. John Adams), 160 Poems on sever
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 4: the New York period (search)
in his pocket and a fixed purpose of rendering at least forty lines out of Greek into English every day. It is a curious fact that he had, like Longfellow, a special gift for foreign languages and liked to translate, and, also like Longfellow, had an occasional impulse toward humor, though the result was never very happy. The Knickerbocker group. Bryant, though sometimes classed among Knickerbocker authors, did not really belong to that clique; not being a native of New York, as were Halleck and Drake, both of whom wrote poems which were declaimed with delight and many gestures by the school-boy of fifty years ago, but which perhaps are no longer heard even in school. The group also included many of those minor writers on whom it cannot be our object to dwell. Among these was George Pope Morrisstill remembered for two or three songsthe editor of the New York Mirror, then the leading literary journal of the nation. Besides being an editor, he held the ornamental position of
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
Drake, Joseph Rodman Born in New York City, Aug. 7, 1795. Left an orphan, he suffered the hardships of poverty and after a brief business career, studied medicine. At fourteen he wrote the poem The Mocking bird. In 1819, he, with Fitz-Greene Halleck, contributed to the N. Y. Evening post a series of humorous verses called The Croakers. His fame chiefly rests on his poem The Culprit Fay, written in 1816. The Culprit Fay and other poems was published in 1836. He died of consumption inr (1786); Poems written between the years 1768 and 1794 (1795); Poems written and published during the American Revolutionary War (1809); and A collection of poems on American affairs (1815). He died near Freehold, N. J., Dec. 18, 1832. Halleck, Fitz-Greene Born in Guilford, Conn., July 8, 1790. He was for many years a clerk in a banking-house, and formed, in 1819, a literary partnership with Joseph Rodman Drake, publishing anonymously in the New York Evening post a series of good-humored
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
d, and Jane Talbot. 1803. Louisiana Purchase. 1807. Joel Barlow's The Columbiad. 1809. Fisher Ames's Speeches and writings. 1809. Lincoln born. 1809. Irving's Knickerbocker's history of New York. 1812. War with England. 1814. Peace with England. 1817. Monroe President. 1820. Irving's Sketch book. 1821. Bryant's Poems. 1821. Cooper's The spy. 1821. James G. Percival's Poems. 1821. R. H. Dana's Dying Buccaneer. 1826. Longfellow's Poems. 1827. Fitz-Greene Halleck's Poems. 1827. Miss Sedgwick's Hope Leslie. 1827. N. P. Willis's Sketches. 1830. W. E. Channing's Discourses, reviews, and Miscellanies. 1831. Whittier's Legends of New England. 1833. Poe's Ms. Found in a Bottle. 1835. Drake's The Culprit Fay and other poems. 1835. Emerson's Historical discourse at Concord. 1835. W. G. Simms's The Yemassee and the Partisan. 1836. Holmes's Poems. 1837. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isa-bella. 1838. Hawthorne's Fanshawe. 1
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