hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 191 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 126 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 98 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 85 1 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 67 13 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 63 5 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 51 13 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 42 12 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Halleck or search for Halleck in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
es was swept by fire and was corduroyed with dead. Refusing to retreat, men sought death by charging forward. Officers threw away their lives by mounting the walls to inspire the men to move out and relieve the horrible jam in the pit. One of these martyrs was a mere boy, Lieutenant Pennell, an aid to General Thomas. So many bullets struck him that his body whirled around like a top before it fell. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, commanding the United States Army, in his report to General Halleck, under date of August 1, 1864, at City Point, Va., says: The loss in the disaster of Saturday last foots up about 3,500, of whom 450 men were killed and 2,000 wounded. It was the saddest affair I have witnessed in the war. Such opportunity for carrying fortifications I have never seen and do not expect to again to have. The enemy, with a line of works five miles long, had been reduced, by our previous movements to the north side of James river, to a force of only three
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
jor-General J. G. Foster, of the United States army, that he had placed five generals and forty-five field officers of the United States army, in a part of the city occupied by non-combatants, the majority of whom are women and children. It is proper that I should inform you that it is a part of the city which has been for many months exposed day and night to the fire of your guns. This letter was sent on the 13th of June, 1864. Forthwith General Foster sent a copy of the letter to General Halleck, at Washington, and thereupon he ordered 600 Confederate officers to be taken from Fort Delaware and placed on Morris Island under the fire of the Confederate guns, in retaliation for the act of General Jones. Of these 600 officers, a list of the Virginians is given herewith, among whom will be found the name of Second Lieutenant C. F. Crisp, 10th Infantry, Luray, Page county. This second lieutenant was the late Speaker of the House of Representatives. Among others of the 600 not