Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for H. W. Halleck or search for H. W. Halleck in all documents.

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Doc. 49.-Colonel Elliott's expedition. General Pope's despatch. Halleck's headquarters, Department of the Mississippi, camp near Corinth, June 1, 1862. To Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: the following despatch has been received from Gen. Pope to Major-Gen. Halleck: It gives me pleasure to report the brilliant success of the expedition sent out on the twenty-eighth inst., under Col. Elliott, with the Second Iowa cavalry. After forced marches, day and night, through a vMajor-Gen. Halleck: It gives me pleasure to report the brilliant success of the expedition sent out on the twenty-eighth inst., under Col. Elliott, with the Second Iowa cavalry. After forced marches, day and night, through a very difficult country, and obstructed by the enemy, he finally succeeded in reaching the Mobile and Ohio Railroad at Boonesville, Miss., at two o'clock A. M. on the thirtieth. He destroyed the track in many places, both south and north of the town, blew up one culvert, destroyed the switch and track, burned up the depot and locomotives and a train of twenty-six cars, loaded with supplies of every kind, destroyed ten thousand stand of small-arms, three pieces of artillery, and a great quantity
Doc. 50.-occupation of Corinth, Miss. General Halleck's report. near Corinth, May 30. To Hen in a style that elicited the approval of Gen. Halleck. Men worked day and night, and as soon as the twenty-seventh, when I received from Major-Gen. Halleck an order by telegraph to send a force thry order given. The house referred to by Gen. Halleck was a double log building, standing on a hihat it was the slow and careful approach of Gen. Halleck which caused the retreat. They would doubt an attack all day, and in order to deceive Gen. Halleck, made several sallies on our pickets. The eption appears to have been complete, for had Halleck known the true condition of affairs, he wouldch could not be carried away. At what time Gen. Halleck first learned of the movement, I am unable have been led to admire the manner in which Gen. Halleck conducted the advance upon Corinth, and hisy away, were fired, and before the arrival of Halleck's army, were consumed. The dense cloud of sm[2 more...]
rd-duty on the Arkansas shore, among the mosquitoes and rattlesnakes, conceived the dangers of the rebel guns would hardly be more formidable than the common enemy of mankind. A large picket force was landed on the Tennessee shore, under Capt. Schermerhorn, who made a detour round, so as to come in the rear of the fort. A bridge was constructed across Cole Creek. The rebels, discovering this, fancied that our force was much larger than it was, and in conjunction with the movements of Gen. Halleck, left them no alternative but to abandon the position. The mortars, as we discovered, had thrown shells into the works, and far beyond them into the woods, but could not learn whether they killed any one. The presumption is against it, as the garrison was quite small, and the places of shelter abundant. The works at Pillow may be described most easily, as first an irregular line of earthworks running along the base of the bluffs for the distance of half a mile continuous, with but
entlemen: My attention has just been called to the following despatch, (published in your issue of yesterday,) of Major-General Halleck, commanding enemy's forces, which, coming from such a source, is most remarkable in one respect: that it containsnes: Washington, June 5, 1862. The following despatch was received this afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Gen. Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty mile The actual number of prisoners taken during the retreat was about equal on both sides, and they were but few. Major-General Halleck must be a very credulous man to believe the absurd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of twsly consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen. Halleck did not capture nine locomotives. It was only by the accidental destruction of a bridge before some trains had passed
mplishing the object of the expedition, to return over another road, but in the same direction he came, and in case he should find his return to Gen. Pope's army rendered impracticable by the enemy, to make his way through Alabama toward Huntsville, and then report to Gen. Mitchel. To better understand the expedition, it should be borne in mind that it was undertaken three days before the intention of Beauregard to abandon Corinth became manifest, and that it was part of the programme of Gen. Halleck to destroy the rebel means of retreat into the interior of Mississippi before or simultaneously with the final assault upon their position, which was to take place the very morning Col. Elliott carried out his instructions at Booneville, and the last rebels left Corinth. In accordance with the above order, the brigade started out precisely at midnight of the twenty-seventh. Col. Elliott, being perfectly ignorant of the roads and country he had to traverse, had procured two guides from
ation, Aug. 22, 1862--12 o'clock M. Major-General Halleck: The number of stragglers leaving thistion, Aug. 22, 5 o'clock P. M., 1862. Major-Gen. Halleck: I think that the troops of Heintzelman rs army of Virginia, Aug. 22--9.15 P. M. Gen. Halleck: Reports from our forces near Sulphur Sprin of you to-morrow night, and have requested Gen. Halleck to push forward Franklin at once, carrying . Centreville, Sept. 1, 8.50 A. M. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: All was quiet yestef Virginia, Fairfax, Sept. 2, 1862. Major-General Halleck: The whole army is returning in good oss-roads, Sept. 2, 1862--7.10 P. M. Major--General Halleck, General--in--Chief, Washington: I arrhe eleventh of September, he telegraphed to Gen. Halleck to have Col. Miles ordered to join him at o Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. General Halleck to General McClellan. Washington, D., Jackson, Tenn., October 5, 1862. To Maj-General Halleck, General-in-Chief U. S. Army: Gen. Ord[15 more...]
lpeper Court-House, August 8, 1862. Major-General Halleck, Washington: One division of the enemyation, Aug. 22, 1862--12 o'clock M. Major-General Halleck: The number of stragglers leaving thistion, Aug. 22, 5 o'clock P. M., 1862. Major-Gen. Halleck: I think that the troops of Heintzelman tation, Aug. 22, 6.30 o'clock P. M. Major-General Halleck : Every thing indicates clearly to me rs army of Virginia, Aug. 22--9.15 P. M. Gen. Halleck: Reports from our forces near Sulphur Sprin of you to-morrow night, and have requested Gen. Halleck to push forward Franklin at once, carrying reville, Aug. 31, 1862--10.45 A. M. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: Our troops are all . Centreville, Sept. 1, 8.50 A. M. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: All was quiet yeste, September 1, 1862, 11 o'clock A. M. Major-Gen. Halleck: The enemy is deploying his forces on thirfax Court-House, September 2, 1862. Major-Gen. Halleck, Washington: As I expected, the enemy la[7 more...]
Doc. 113.-battle of Phillips Creek, Miss. Fought May 21, 1862. before Corinth, May 22, 1862. The second division of Gen. Halleck's army, commanded by Brig.-General Thomas A. Davies, received orders to move yesterday at seven o'clock. Punctual to the time designated, the line of battle was formed, ten regiments front to occupy the ridge north of Phillips Creek. The line was halted and formed on the first ridge beyond Bridge Creek, and the artillery brought up — a section between each two regiments, on account of the density of the timber. The pickets, who occupied the ridge and slope in advance of the whole front of the line, then opened a brisk fire on the four regiments and the picket line of the enemy concealed in the thick underbrush on Phillips Creek, which they heartily returned. Under the noise which ensued, the infantry line advanced behind the crest of the ridge, formed in line of battle, and the artillery were again brought up. Our whole picket line was then with
red to Martinsburgh, to take command of the forces there. On the twelfth of September he again returned to Harper's Ferry, where he remained until the surrender, without assuming the command. On the seventh of September Gen. McClellan, the most of his forces having preceded him, left Washington under orders issued some days previously, to drive the enemy from Maryland. That night he established his headquarters at Rockville, from which, on the eleventh of September, he telegraphed to Gen. Halleck to have Col. Miles ordered to join him at once. On the fifth of September Col. Thomas H. Ford, thirty-second Ohio, took command of the forces on Maryland Heights. Forces were placed at Solomon's Gap and at Sandy Hook. Those at Sandy Hook, under Col. Maulsby, retired by Col. Miles's order to the eastern slope of Maryland Heights, two or three days previous to their evacuation by Col. Ford. On the eleventh of September the force at Solomon's Gap were driven in by the enemy. Col. Fo
the regiment. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Joseph B. Curtis, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Fourth Rhode Island Report of General McClellan. near Sharpsburgh, September 29--1.30 P. M. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief, U. S. Army: General: I have the honor to report the following as some of the results of the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam: At South-Mountain our loss was 443 killed, 1806 wounded; total, 2325. At Antietae battle. At South-Mountain no collection of small arms was made, owing to the haste of the pursuit from that point. Four hundred small arms were taken from the opposite side of the Potomac. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. General Halleck to General McClellan. Washington, D. C., September 30, 1862. Major-General McClellan, Commanding, etc.: General: Your report of yesterday, giving the results of the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam, has been received and submit
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