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ry respectfully, Your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. After some consultat directions were given in the odder from General Halleck to me, dated November fifth, to report at of Staff, the following day; after which General Halleck telegraphed me that he thought he would m next morning we had long consultations. General Halleck was strongly in favor of continuing the m from Washington. In my interview with General Halleck, I represented to him that soon after comucceed if you move rapidly, otherwise not. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. This despatch was r It was my intention, and I so informed General Halleck, to cross some of the cavalry, and, possimouth on the seventeenth, I despatched to General Halleck's Chief of Staff a report which explaineding from these trains, I sent a report to General Halleck. It appeared afterward that no supplies but was informed that he had gone to see General Halleck; but while waiting for his return was tol[4 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
oned by our troops. He found General Longstreet's pickets in the vicinity of Sandy Cross. Twenty-first.--The command was highly honored by a visit from Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief, accompanied by Major-General Dix. Twenty-second.--A heavy rain storm commenced, suspending all fatigue labors; but adding materiallumbers. I am, very respectfully Your obedient servant, John J. Peck, Major-General. headquarters Eighteenth Army corps, Newbery, April 17, 1863. Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief, Washington, D. C.: Being about to start with a relieving force to raise the siege of Washington, North Carolina, I learned that thk, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson. Hooker's and Lee's forces. Up to the meeting of Congress, Hooker had made no report to General Halleck, and official data is out of the question. But information is at hand from which an approximation can be made. Lee's Army. New York Tribune, May 18, 186
Hooker's and Lee's forces. Up to the meeting of Congress, Hooker had made no report to General Halleck, and official data is out of the question. But information is at hand from which an approximation can be made. Lee's Army. New York Tribune, May 18, 1863, estimates 50,000 New York Tribune, March 26, 1861, estimates 49,700 New York Herald, March 26, 1864, estimates 64,000 Southorn history (Pollard's) gives 50,000 Hooker's Army. New York Times gives 159,800 Southorn history gives 100,000 to 150,000 New York Tribune, March 26, 1864, gives 123,300 The editor of the Times had the very best opportunity for getting reliable data, and there are many reasons for accepting his figures as nearest the true ones. This paper explodes the idea that any material portion of Longstreet's army was transferred to the fields of Chancellorsville. No such theory is entertained in any quarter now; but in the smoke of that disaster it was mooted. These figures
d on. General Butler and Admiral Lee examined a courier of General Pickett's, and he was sent to me March eighth. He stated: Impression when he left was that Newbern would be attacked when the ram was done. General Hoke said it was a pity they had not waited for the ram, as Newbern might have been taken without trouble. General Hoke placed three hundred men at work on the iron-clad. On the ninth of March he wrote, viz: I have laid your previous despatches before General Halleck, and he tells me that he knows of no troops that can be spared for our Department; so we must work along as we are. Major-General Butler wrote, February twentieth, in response to this and much more information, viz: I don't believe in the iron-clad. On the ninth of March, he wrote as follows: With the force you have, we shall expect you to hold North Carolina against all comers. Don't let the army get frightened at the ram, she must have at least two feet of water to f
d on. General Butler and Admiral Lee examined a courier of General Pickett's, and he was sent to me March eighth. He stated: Impression when he left was that Newbern would be attacked when the ram was done. General Hoke said it was a pity they had not waited for the ram, as Newbern might have been taken without trouble. General Hoke placed three hundred men at work on the iron-clad. On the ninth of March he wrote, viz: I have laid your previous despatches before General Halleck, and he tells me that he knows of no troops that can be spared for our Department; so we must work along as we are. Major-General Butler wrote, February twentieth, in response to this and much more information, viz: I don't believe in the iron-clad. On the ninth of March, he wrote as follows: With the force you have, we shall expect you to hold North Carolina against all comers. Don't let the army get frightened at the ram, she must have at least two feet of water to f
division, and brigade commanders, a perusal of which will fill up the sketch which I have endeavored to make. I also submit tabular statements of our losses in battle by wounds and sickness; also, lists of prisoners captured, sent to the rear, and exhanged; also, of the guns and materials of war captured, besides the important country, towns, and arsenals of the enemy that we now occupy and hold. All of which is respectfully submitted. W. T. Sherman, Major-General Commanding. Major-General H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. Official correspondence. headquarters military division, of the Mississippi, in the field Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 9, 1864.) General J. B. Hood, Commanding Army of Tennessee, Confederate Army: General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this date, at the hands of Messrs. Ball & Crew, consenting to the arrangements I had proposed to facilitate the removal south of the people of Atlanta, who prefer to go in that di
ction may be recorded at the War Department. I am, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, H. W. Slocum, Major-General Commanding. General Meade's letter. headquarters, Army of the Potomac, February 25, 1864. Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-chief, Washington, D. C.: General: I transmit herewith the report of Brigadier-General T. H. Ruger, commanding First division, Twelfth Army Corps, and those of his brigade and regimental commanders, of the operations of published. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, George G. Meade, Major-General Commanding. Headquarters Army on the Potomac, March 10, 1864. Brigadier-General G. S. Greene, Washington, D. C.: General: I could not procure from General Halleck a copy of my letter, containing my report of the battle of Gettysburg, but will have one made on my return, from the original, which I have with me. I trust it will prove satisfactory to you, although I have not made such particular mention
r-General Hunter was appointed to supersede him. His instructions were embraced in the following despatches to Major-General H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff of the army: near Spotisylvania Court-House, Va., May 20, 1864. * * * * * The enemy can hold at bay a force equal to his own, he will be doing good service. * * U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. Jericho ford, Va., May 25, 1864. If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should dis way back to his original base, or from about Gordonsville join this army. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and moving up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy on te Department, and I so recommended. On the second of August, I ordered General Sheridan to report in person to Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff, at Washington, with a view to his assignment to the command of all the forces against Early. At
ort, Mississippi; Wood's corps to be concentrated at Huntsville and Athens, Alabama; Schofield's corps to proceed to Dalton, Georgia; and Wilson's cavalry, after sending one division to Eastport, Mississippi, to concentrate the balance at or near Huntsville. On reaching the several positions assigned to them, the different commands were to go into winter quarters and recuperate for the spring campaign. The above not meeting the views of the General-in-chief, and being notified by Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff, United States Army, that it was not intended for the Army of Tennessee to go into winter quarters, orders were issued on the thirty-first of December for Generals Schofield, Smith, and Wilson, to concentrate their commands at Eastport, Mississippi, and that of General Wood at Huntsville, Alabama, preparatory to a renewal of the campaign against the enemy in Mississippi and Alabama. During the active operations of the main army in Middle Tennessee, General Stoneman
d. I believe that this cheerfulness and harmony of action reflects upon all concerned quite as much real honor and fame as battles gained or cities won, and I therefore commend all, generals, staff, officers, and men, for these high qualities, in addition to the more soldierly ones of obedience to orders and the alacrity they have always manifested when danger summoned them to the front. I have the honor to be Your obedient servant, W. T. Sherman, Major-General, Commanding. Major-General H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. Gfneral Schofield's report. headquarters Department of North Carolina, Army of the Ohio, Goldsboro, N. C., April 3, 1865. General: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the troops under my command since January 1, 1865, the date of my last report, addressed to Major-General George H. Thomas, commanding Department of the Cumberland, under whose command I was then serving. On the second of January, 1865,
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